Mhow administration starts burying pigs | india | Hindustan Times
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Mhow administration starts burying pigs

THE CANTONMENT Board here has started burying the pigs that had died due to some mysterious disease. The Board?s health in-charge Manish Agrawal said about two dozen pigs were buried on Monday and 500-odd remained to be buried.

india Updated: Mar 21, 2006 13:18 IST

THE CANTONMENT Board here has started burying the pigs that had died due to some mysterious disease. The Board’s health in-charge Manish Agrawal said about two dozen pigs were buried on Monday and 500-odd remained to be buried.

Earlier, the dead pigs were being thrown at the trenching ground near Banda Basti, which resulted in sharp protests from the residents of Gujarkheda village and the areas adjoining the trenching ground.

The reaction came after word did the rounds of a possibility of the disease spreading among human beings also if the bodies were thrown openly on the trenching ground.

Due to the reaction, the Cantonment Board administration decided to dig a well in the trenching ground and bury all the bodies brought to this place. The Cantonment Board’s nominated member Mujeeb Qureshi said that the decision to bury the bodies was taken in an emergency meeting to check further spread of the disease.

Mujeeb Qureshi further said the toll figure indicated that the death rate had declined in the last two days though the cause of the death of these pigs had still not been identified.

Talking to Hindustan Times, Dr Bagherwal of the Mhow Veterinary College said that the administration did not have a proper report on the type of the disease and its causes, and there was a possibility that death could have occurred due to salmonella bacteria that develops and multiplies on the food waste at a very fast rate.

The pigs, after eating the waste food infected with salmonella bacteria, get their liver and intestines badly affected. Flies carry the salmonella bacteria from their urinary waste to the food articles of human beings and thus it can also affect humans also.

Secondly, he said, the time has come for the pigsties’ owners to decide to have well-organised pigsties outside the city and the animals should not be left to roam in the streets and by-lanes of the cities.