No surprise: BCCI messes up again | india | Hindustan Times
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No surprise: BCCI messes up again

The world's richest cricketing body flunked another test of professionalism - it forgot (or didn?t care) to book a room for the press conference.

india Updated: Apr 21, 2006 11:45 IST

The Board of Control for Cricket in India’s new regime, headed by Union Minister Sharad Pawar, claims to have an altogether different approach from that of his predecessor, Jagmohan Dalmiya. However, though both factions are at loggerheads, media management (or mismanagement) has been a very visible common character of both regimes.

On Thursday, the super-rich Board's selection committee met at the Taj Lands End here. And again, the world's richest cricketing body flunked another test of professionalism -- the BCCI forgot (or didn’t care) to book a room for the press conference that was to follow.

As a result, mediamen were stranded in the hotel lobby, which resulted in chaos. And the hotel management was very upset. "All they asked us for was a place to hold the meeting," said a hotel source. "We never knew they were going to have a press conference."

When a scribe called BCCI secretary Niranjan Shah to ask where the conference was happening, he replied, "In the lobby." Neither Shah nor any other official was probably aware that five-star hotels do not allow cameramen to shoot in lobbies. However, following requests, the hotel management responded positively (for a change) and made a lounge available.

Over the last few months, the BCCI has repeatedly ignored media arrangements, a policy resulting in chaos in venue after venue.

Arranging a press conference takes only a phone call and a few thousand rupees. But the multi-millionaire body, which deals mostly in dollars, seems to have a problem affording a relatively small amount.

Shah and the BCCI's dashing vice president, Lalit Modi, had said soon after the new regime took charge, "Give us some time. The facilities will improve very soon." Six months or so and we're still waiting.