Reservation will divide country: Ratan | india | Hindustan Times
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Reservation will divide country: Ratan

Tata Sons Chairman made it clear that merit should be the only criterion for securing jobs, reports Sanjay Kumar. Is the Govt move a step in right direction?

india Updated: Apr 08, 2006 09:41 IST

In a scathing attack on the move to introduce reservation for other backward castes in higher education institutes funded by the central Government, Tata Sons Chairman Ratan N Tata warned that such a policy would "divide" the nation.

Addressing a press conference on the occasion of Convocation 2006, at IMT Ghaziabad, he said, "Though I do not want to comment, reservation is bad... In some way, it will tend to divide the country into different groups."

Ratan Tata asserted that efforts should be made to encourage people to stay unified. Heexpressed displeasure over the reservations, calling it a "bad" move.

 
From Left to Right Dr BS Sahay, Director, IMT Ghaziabad, Kamal Nath, Union Minister for Commerce and Industries and Ratan N Tata, Chairman, Tata Sons at the convocation ceremony of the B-school in Ghaziabad on Friday.

On reports of Government gearing up for introducing job reservation in private sector, he said, "I do not think this is a right way to go forward. Sadly, such policies would not help in the development of the nation."

While the upliftment of the socially backward classes was important, merit should be the only criteria and there should be no compromise on this issue, he added.

He urged the students to make their mark in various fields by upholding the principles and values, thus combining their vision with passion.

Union Minister for Commerce and Industries, Kamal Nath, who is also the president of the institute, encouraged the students to play a pivotal role and face the challenges in moulding the destiny of the nation.

He referred to the fast pace of economic growth in India led by the metaphoric shifting of trade winds which had moved the hub of economic activity from the Atlantic to the Indian ocean.