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Residents lose count of power trips

OFFICIALLY, THE State Capital may be exempt from power rostering, but the tran-Gomti areas, making up almost half the city, have been reeling under an acute power crisis like any other city. And the situation is only going from bad to worse.

india Updated: Jan 14, 2006 01:15 IST

OFFICIALLY, THE State Capital may be exempt from power rostering, but the tran-Gomti areas, making up almost half the city, have been reeling under an acute power crisis like any other city. And the situation is only going from bad to worse.

Unlike earlier, when power cuts were mainly confined to morning hours, now the hide and seek game of electricity goes on all the time. Again, the power cuts are being attributed to the grid’s low frequency, which, they say, makes the lines trip for safety of the grid. However, it is quite debatable whether the problem exists due to low frequency or something else.

For the last five days, trans-Gomti localities like Indira Nagar, Mahanagar, Vikas Nagar, Aliganj, and Jankipuram have been undergoing the worst-ever crisis these days and the people are sweating even at the mention of summer. “If the situation is so bad in winter, one can guess what the situation would be during summer,” said a resident. Following complaints by the UP Rajya Vidyut Upbhokta Parisahad, the UPPCL authorities had on Thursday agreed to arrange things in such a way that lines tripped only when the grid frequency was below 48.3 Hertz instead of 48.4 Hertz. It was claimed that power would not trip from Friday due to low frequency. But power tripped so many times today that one really could not keep count of it!

Likewise, a large part of Alambagh went without electricity for several hours together, following a fault in an underground cable.

On the other hand, the State continued to face massive power rostering on Friday as well, due to the demand-supply gap. As against the total availability of around 5065 MW, demand for electricity today was as high as 7,000 MW. This left a whopping gap of 1700 MW with the UPPCL imposing indiscriminate power cuts through out the State. With thermal general as low as 2071 MW, the UPPCL had to purchase costly power from the Centre to the tune of 2900 MW, but the gap was obviously too big to be filled.

First Published: Jan 14, 2006 01:15 IST