Trilateral talks remedy of J&K ills: Hurriyat | india | Hindustan Times
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Trilateral talks remedy of J&K ills: Hurriyat

In spite of political process getting a momentum in militancy-torn Jammu and Kashmir with a coalition government in the offing, Hurriyat Conference today asked the Centre to try to solve the "real issue" through a trilateral dialogue and said efforts were on to facilitate a meeting between Kashmir Committee and their counterparts in Pakistan.

india Updated: Oct 29, 2002 21:33 IST

In spite of political process getting a momentum in militancy-torn Jammu and Kashmir with a coalition government in the offing, Hurriyat Conference today asked the Centre to try to solve the "real issue" through a trilateral dialogue and said efforts were on to facilitate a meeting between Kashmir Committee and their counterparts in Pakistan.

"I am going to hold another round of talks with Pakistan Deputy High Commissioner Jaleel A Jilani to forward the process of talks, which the Kashmir Committee initiated with us, to that side of the border to achieve concrete results in solving the Kashmir issue," Hurriyat Conference Chairman Abdul Ghani Bhat said.

Bhat, who has had meetings with Jilani and KC Chairman Ram Jethmalani over the last few days, said the problem of Kashmir could be solved only if there was trilateral dialogue between India, Pakistan and the people of Kashmir and for that it was necessary to open up the fronts at various levels.

"Soon there will be another government in the state but that is not the permanent solution of the problem. We are making efforts to involve people from both the sides for a fruitful dialogue," Bhat said.

"We have to come to grips with the dynamics of the Kashmir problem and realise there is no escape but to hold dialogue if we want to look for a permanent solution to the Kashmir issue," Bhat said.

Pointing out that continuation of the problem could result in "big trouble" as both the countries were nuclear powers, he said "we have to rise above pettiness for a big cause and address the real issue."

Asked if their efforts would be worthwhile as there was no elected government in place at the time in Pakistan, Bhat said "the fact one has to realise is that Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf is very powerful and initiation of dialogue under his regime can bear fruits."

"Secondly, governments come and they go, it has to be people-to-people contact between the two countries. That is important," he added.