Hajj 2022: Know all about the date, history, significance of Muslims pilgrimage and Day of Arafah

Updated on Jul 06, 2022 02:09 PM IST
Hajj 2022: Here’s all you need to know about the date, history and significance of the Muslims' pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia and the importance of the Day of Arafah, ahead of Eid-ul-Adha or Bakra Eid
Muslim worshippers around the Kaaba at the Grand Mosque in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Mecca on July 5, 2022. - One million people, including 850,000 from abroad, are allowed to participate in this year's hajj -- a key pillar of Islam that all able-bodied Muslims with the means are required to perform at least once -- after two years of drastically curtailed numbers due to the coronavirus pandemic.  (Photo by AFP)
Muslim worshippers around the Kaaba at the Grand Mosque in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Mecca on July 5, 2022. - One million people, including 850,000 from abroad, are allowed to participate in this year's hajj -- a key pillar of Islam that all able-bodied Muslims with the means are required to perform at least once -- after two years of drastically curtailed numbers due to the coronavirus pandemic.  (Photo by AFP)
ByZarafshan Shiraz, Delhi

After restricting the annual Islamic ritual of Hajj to some thousands of Muslims living inside the country for the last two years due to Covid-19 pandemic, Saudi Arabia has finally eased the travel restrictions to increase the number and allowed 1 million pilgrims from inside and outside the kingdom to perform the Muslim pilgrimage to Kaaba, the "House of God", in the sacred city of Mecca. Hajj to Mecca is among the five pillars of Islam which is obligatory only for those who are healthy and can afford it financially as well as physically.

This fifth and final pillar of Islam is liable to be performed by Muslims at least once in their lifetime where they shed overt displays of wealth and materialism, dress in simple white clothes and perform the rituals. The Day of Arafah is the holiest day in the Islamic calendar and is observed on the second day of the Hajj pilgrimage.

While Eid-ul-Adha or Bakra Eid is the second most important festival celebrated by Muslims across the world, on the tenth day of the Islamic month of Zul Hijjah, the Day of Arafah i.e. the ninth day of Dhu al-Hijjah is considered as the most important day as it is the day of repentance. Here's all you need to know about the date, history and significance of Hajj or the Muslims' pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia and the importance of the Day of Arafah, ahead of Eid-ul-Adha or Bakra Eid.

Date:

Hajj begins on the 8th day and ends on the 12th day of Dhu al-Hijjah, the twelfth month of the Islamic calendar. This year, Hajj will begin in the evening of Thursday, 7 July, 2022 and ends in the evening of Tuesday, 12 July, 2022.

History:

A visit to the holy shrine of Kaaba in Mecca has a remarkable history. Muslims believe that Prophet Ibrahim or Abraham, the dearest friend of God and father of prophets, was instructed by God to leave his wife Hajar and son Ismail in the desert of Mecca.

Ibrahim left the family well-flourished but in due course of time, it all diminished and his wife Hajar and son Ismail faced lots of trouble. On one occasion, Hajar travelled seven times between the hills of Safa and Marwah but was unable to find any source of water.

However, when her little son Ismail rubbed the ground with his foot, a water fountain sprang up at the spot. This spot was then marked sacred and God ordered Ibrahim to build Kaaba at that place and to invite people to perform pilgrimage there.

Ibrahim and Ismail did as instructed and the Quran even narrates how the archangel, Gabriel, brought the Black Stone (which was originally white but has become black by absorbing the sins of the thousands of pilgrims who have kissed and touched it) from heaven to be attached to the Kaaba.

Later in pre-Islamic Arabia time of “jahiliyyah”, some pagan idols were placed around the Kaaba but in 630 CE, Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) led the believers from Medina to Mecca and cleansed the Kaaba by destroying all the pagan idols. He was another messiah and the last prophet considered in Islam.

After cleansing the Kaaba, he reconsecrated the building to Allah and performed his first and last pilgrimage there in 632 CE. This was followed by Prophet Muhammad’s sermon to his followers on the rites of it and that is how Hajj became one of the five pillars of Islam.

Significance:

Hajj facilitates and tends to bring together Muslims across the world in a spirit of unity and brotherhood without any discrimination based on caste, culture and colour, an unmitigated representation of equality. It is believed that whoever performs the Hajj rites truly and with purity, returns home washing off all their lifelong sins.

This annual pilgrimage not only ensures equality but it also rewards pilgrims heaven after death, if the obligations are performed righteously. It symbolises kindness, positivity and is the highest form of honour earned as it is a re-enactment of the sacrifices and obedience of Prophet Abraham to God almighty, following the instructions laid down by Prophet Muhammad.

Importance of Day of Arafah:

While Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries are marking the Day of Arafah on July 8, Muslims in India will observe it on July 9. Arafah Day falls on the ninth of Dhu al-Hijjah and commemorates finality of the religion of Islam and of Divine revelation.

It is basically the climax of Hajj when Muslim pilgrims gather at Mount Arafat and offer a day-long prayer with recitations of the Quran. Since Mount Arafat is approximately 15 kms away from Mecca, the Muslim pilgrims spend a day there to perform the rituals and live in tents from dawn to dusk.

It was on Mount Arafat that Prophet Mohammed (PBUH) gave his last sermon of Islam hence, pilgrims stand here united as a dignified ritual, to seek forgiveness through reflection and prayer and it is this moment that may be described as “standing before God”. While fasting on the Day of Arafah is prohibited for the pilgrims, it is a highly recommended Sunnah for non-pilgrims as it entails a great reward with the belief that Allah forgives the sins of two years.

While Arafah Day is viewed by Muslims as a day of gratitude, the next day is celebrated as Eid-ul-Adha which marks another sacrifice by Prophet Ibrahim. In normal times, around 2.5 million Muslim pilgrims would gather on Mount Arafat but owing to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, preventive and precautionary measures have been placed to ensure the health and safety of the pilgrims hence, only 1 million worshippers have been allowed to the holy site this year by Saudi Arabia government.

The Saudi authorities have said that eligible pilgrims this year must be under 65, fully vaccinated against Covid-19 and present a negative PCR test result. The Royal Commission for Makkah City and Holy Sites has launched a series of special exhibitions and enrichment initiatives that will take place at the holy sites during Hajj 2022 to provide Muslim pilgrims with enhanced spiritual and cultural experiences as part of an unforgettable Hajj journey.

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