Incredible Sudemau: Living with door-less homes and a superstition | lucknow | Hindustan Times
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Incredible Sudemau: Living with door-less homes and a superstition

Not for nothing we call India incredible! At a time when security remains a key concern, here is a village where homes do not have front doors, leave aside people using heavy locks and employing guards to keep themselves secure.

lucknow Updated: Sep 20, 2017 13:05 IST
Farhan Ahmed Siddiqui
Over a hundred cemented and mud houses are without doors from last eight generations.
Over a hundred cemented and mud houses are without doors from last eight generations.

Not for nothing we call India incredible! At a time when security remains a key concern, here is a village where homes do not have front doors, leave aside people using heavy locks and employing guards to keep themselves secure.

Welcome to Sudemau village in Pratapgarh, where over a hundred cemented and mud houses are without doors from last eight generations.

And not a single case of theft or loot has been reported, a feat that also surprises cops posted in nearby Patti Kotwali police station.

“We believe that ‘Nag Devta’ (the mythical god of snakes) guards our houses,” says Vijay Narayan Mishra, a resident of the village also credited with producing doctors, engineers, teachers and lawyers.

Professional and educational background notwithstanding, the villagers have been blindly following a superstition that a front door in their abode will bring in miseries.

Behind the age-old tradition is a legend, according to which, a small snake was trapped between two parts of the door and crushed to death accidentally when a resident was closing it.

“The incident got us the curse that if anyone in the family of the man responsible for the serpent’s death would install a door in his house, his entire generation will be destroyed,” claimed villagers.

Fearing the curse, every generation of the entire village had been blindly following the practice, without complain.

Interestingly, many vouch that those who tried to break the tradition and installed doors had to suffer.

“There were untimely deaths of family members besides other problems. However, everything became normal once the doors were taken off,” claimed Vijay Narayan, whose father built his house outside the village and installed doors.

“Soon after, he had to bear the loss of his brother,” claimed Narayan while citing a few other incidents where persons trying to install doors in their houses had to suffer.

Rajkumar Devi claimed that her mother-in-law once installed an iron railing to ward off wild animals.

She remained childless for years until the family realized their mistake and threw away the railing.

“She delivered a baby soon after,” said Kamlakant Mishra, another resident.

“Anyone who tried to go against the tradition had to suffer from ugly consequences,” added Mishra.