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World Hypertension Day: ‘By 2030, 25% of all deaths will be attributed to CVDs’

“By 2030, 25% of all deaths will be due to non-communicable cardio vascular diseases and 16% due to malignancies, which need attention right now. The situation can be avoided.”

lucknow Updated: May 18, 2018 12:32 IST
Gaurav Saigal
Gaurav Saigal
Hindustan Times, Lucknow
World Hypertension Day,Cardio Vascular disease,Non-communicable cardio vascular diseases
Blood pressure between 130 and 139 and 80 and 89 is considered first stage of hypertension and anything above 140 by 90 is the second stage.(Shutterstock)

By 2030, 25% of all deaths in the world will be attributed to cardio-vascular diseases (CVDs), much of which are caused by hypertension, said Prof Rishi Sethi, senior faculty, cardiology at the King George’s Medical University.

“High blood pressure stabilises when a patient is given treatment. But what actual damage is done to the body/organs because of high BP is not known to the patient during the period,” said Prof Sethi on the sidelines of World Hypertension Day conference organised by IMA on Thursday.

“By 2030, 25% of all deaths will be due to non-communicable cardio vascular diseases and 16% due to malignancies, which need attention right now. The situation can be avoided,” he added.

“Blood pressure between 130 and 139 and 80 and 89 is considered first stage of hypertension and anything above 140 by 90 is the second stage. As many as 30 lakh people in the country suffer heart attack every year. Those with high BP are at 50% more risk of heart attack,” he said.

He said hypertension can be prevented by avoiding stress, alcohol and doing some physical work/exercise as a routine. “Doing these things is equivalent to getting treatment for hypertension,” he advised.

“The World Health Organisation says hypertension is the leading cause of death. This is because it gives opportunity to other diseases to kill humans,” said Sethi.

Prof NS Verma, senior faculty at department of physiology, KGMU also delivered lecture on hypertension and gave tips on how one can avoid hypertension by changing lifestyle. He said that every individual can adjust lifestyle as per work profile.

“Once you follow healthy routine, much of the health problems are avoided,” he said.

First Published: May 18, 2018 12:31 IST