Faridabad gets its first rehab centre for pups

Vrinda Sharma, a 24-year-old resident of the suburb, rescues and rehabilitates injured and unwell puppies.
Vrinda Sharma, a Faridabad resident, has started a rehabilitation centre for dogs near her house.
Vrinda Sharma, a Faridabad resident, has started a rehabilitation centre for dogs near her house.
Published on Oct 03, 2020 12:50 PM IST
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Hindustan Times | By, New Delhi

The foremost requirements to initiate any change are willingness, positive attitude and determination. And 24-year-old Vrinda Sharma, who works in the corporate sector, has brought all three together to work for the cause of stray dogs.

Since childhood, Sharma has been helping little pups on Faridabad’s road. But her work has multiplied ever since the pandemic set in. “Since the lockdown, I’ve been feeding and looking after 100 plus dogs everyday. I started with 180 plus dogs, but due to lack of money I now have 80 less. I’ve got more than 75 dogs sterilised this year. I vaccinate them, treat them for any sickness, and deworm them. I do everything that I can to make their lives easier. Right from parvovirus to severely hit and run cases, I’ve been seeing all cases single handedly, and providing as much care for them as possible,” says Sharma.

“I manage to do this with my salary and savings,” says Sharma, who has now started a crowdfunding campaign on Milaap, to sustain her endeavours for the voiceless. Besides, she also encourages people to donate through her Facebook page.

“I started the pup rehabilitation centre because not many shelters take in sick pups... the pups found on the road are mostly not vaccinated, and more susceptible to diseases from other ailing dogs in shelters. They need extra care and a full time supervision.”

On being the first one to start a rehab for pups in Faridabad, Sharma says, “I started the pup rehabilitation centre because not many shelters take in sick pups. This is because the pups found on the road are mostly not vaccinated, and in the shelter they will be more susceptible to diseases from other ailing dogs. Also, they need extra care and a full time supervision. During the lockdown, I treated more than 40 pups on the spot, that is on footpaths, gardens and even empty plots. There was absolutely no place where I could take them until they recovered. It is a saddening state. I have a capacity of 15 dogs, which is currently full. I get orphans, ailing pups who have no chance of survival on the road.”

But Sharma’s journey isn’t that easy since she’s often subjected to misbehaviour while trying to help the pups. “I’m one of the few who is working for strays in this city, and supporting animal rights. It’s not just the finances, but doing everything alone as a girl, in Haryana, which makes me a vulnerable to harassment and misbehaviour on a regular basis. I see my charity’s future as one that changes perceptions about Indian stray dogs and helps mobilise support for the strays, feeders and rescuers. The work is growing drastically, and it makes me believe that people feel for the cause. But, I feel that many living in urban cities still don’t have the much needed awareness.”

Author tweets @ruchikagarg271

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  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Ruchika Garg writes on Art and Culture, for the daily Entertainment & Lifestyle supplement, HT City

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Sunday, January 23, 2022