Mumbai civic body’s health scheme finds no bidder, tender to open soon | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai civic body’s health scheme finds no bidder, tender to open soon

Officials from central purchasing department of BMC said that they have launched the second tender, after the first launched in 2017 proved to be a failure considering no bidder came forth.

mumbai Updated: Feb 07, 2018 01:00 IST
The municipal corporation will give contracts of diagnostic tests to private bidders for public hospitals.
The municipal corporation will give contracts of diagnostic tests to private bidders for public hospitals. (HT FILE)

While the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has set aside funds in 2018-19 budget for expanding diagnostic and emergency care services at its periphery (secondary) hospitals and dispensaries, similar schemes promised in last year’s budget are yet to see the light of the day.

One of the plans in the past budget has been to make available diagnostic tests at municipal health clinics contracted to private laboratories. This was to reduce the pressure on periphery hospitals. Municipal officials confirmed that even after they launched tenders twice asking private laboratories to bid for the scheme, not a single diagnostic laboratory has showed interest in the Rs16 crore ‘Aapli Chikitsa’ plan.

Officials from central purchasing department of BMC said that they have launched the second tender, after the first launched in 2017 proved to be a failure considering no bidder came forth.

“The earlier tender didn’t get any response. This tender is expected to be open in eight days, and we are hoping for the bidders to come forth,” said Ram Dhas, deputy municipal commissioner, central purchasing department, BMC.

Executive health officer of BMC, Dr Padmaja Keskar said that the scheme was meant to reduce the burden on tertiary care facilities. “Through the scheme, patients will be able to avail these tests at dispensaries, maternity homes and periphery hospitals which currently either offer limited or no diagnostic facilities. Our aim was to reduce the referral rate of tertiary care facilities so that timely diagnosis can be made,” said Dr Keskar.