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Home / Music / When you cut your finger, the bruise is visible, but the emotional trauma that people go through leaves deeper cuts which cannot be seen: Shilpa Rao

When you cut your finger, the bruise is visible, but the emotional trauma that people go through leaves deeper cuts which cannot be seen: Shilpa Rao

The singer says that when she was going through a tough time, mentally, she resorted to travelling, and that helped her, but it many not help everyone.

music Updated: Jul 08, 2020 19:27 IST
Nikita Deb
Nikita Deb
Singer Shilpa Rao says that in developing countries like India, mental health usually takes a back-seat because people are more concerned about the basic necessities.
Singer Shilpa Rao says that in developing countries like India, mental health usually takes a back-seat because people are more concerned about the basic necessities.

Singer Shilpa Rao can be termed as one of the most successful singers in Bollywood right now. So, when conversations around mental health of people in showbiz caught fire recently, it came as a shock when she revealed what a tough time she went through in 2013, mentally. The singer says that in developing countries like India, the common man is always more concerned about the “basic necessities” and hence, one’s mental health always takes a back-seat.

“I know for a fact that a lot of my friends, who are not from the music industry, face the same issues of mental health problems. This is common among people across the world, and it is not a career specific problem. All of us are going through it. A lot of us have our ways and means to deal with it, but some don’t,” says Rao, while adding that in 2013 after the release of her hit song Manmarziyan in Lootera, she reached a point where she could see a “dead end”.  

“I was doing a lot of work, and it was getting the kind of recognition that it deserved from the audiences, but I wasn’t achieving the stature that I should have. So it was getting to me. It used to really hurt when a lot of cover singers who have gained popularity singing my songs, were more popular than me when. So after Manmarziyan, I completely went into a shell, and I gave up,” adds Rao.

The singer, who is known to not be very visible in the media, says that at that point, she started going to only recording studios and live gigs because that’s where “she would thrive”. “I was brought up in an environment where I knew I had to sing well and that’s how I function, not by marketing or publicity. So I am a little school but that hasn’t changed even now. I still feel very nervous going for a recording,” says the Tose Naina (Anwar) singer.

 

Hence, Rao believes that it is very important for everyone to see a therapist. “We all have friends and well wishers but when we have a therapist, we have a sure shot person who we know will be there whenever we need to talk or unclutter our mind. If you have a fever, you won’t consult your friends right? And to be brutally honest, when you cut your finger, the bruise is visible, but the emotional trauma that people go through leaves deeper cuts which cannot be seen,” says Rao, who adds that she healed herself by travelling a lot.  

“In 2013 I started to travel a lot because I never spoke to anybody about my issues. I would just pick up my bag and my passport and that gave me a perspective of how you zoom out and look at yourself. I met a lot of new people from across the world, who had nothing to do with my profession, and with whom, I just had conversations. It just changed the way I looked at things. It changed my outlook completely. So, now, whenever I meet Pritam (composer), I can speak to him about everything under the sun and that’s because now, I connect to him on a very human level. I started doing that with people only post 2013. So, for me, travelling worked. But for a lot of us, it may not,” she signs off.

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