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RWAs not keen on Noida authority’s composting machines

In 2017, the authority had introduced measures to implement the Solid Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 2016, in the city. As part of this, hi-tech composting machines that could be installed within housing societies were introduced.

noida Updated: Mar 17, 2018 22:29 IST
Snehil Sinha
Snehil Sinha
Hindustan Times
residents’ welfare association,Noida authority,hi-tech composting machines
A composting machine, mounted on a vehicle, was introduced in Sector 34 last October. Officials said the process of generating awareness on waste segregation at source is a long and tedious one and it is difficult to get residents to take responsibility.(Virendra Singh Gosain/HT PHOTO)

Not a single residents’ welfare association (RWA) has expressed interest in acquiring the composting machines introduced and partly financed by the Noida authority. Residents said they are willing to segregate waste but are weary of the recurrent expenditure and odour.

In 2017, the authority had introduced measures to implement the Solid Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 2016, in the city. As part of this, hi-tech composting machines that could be installed within housing societies were introduced.

To promote waste segregation at source and consequent recycling or composting, the authority had proposed to bear 75% of the cost of the initial purchase and installation while the RWAs would have to pay the remaining 25%. The composting machines would cost approximately Rs 6 lakh to Rs 12 lakh, depending on the size and capacity.

“We introduced these machines for the welfare of residents as recycling is a sustainable and healthy choice. However, no RWA showed an interest to take it up,” RS Yadav, senior project engineer (health), Noida authority, said.

Officials said the process of generating awareness on waste segregation at source is a long and tedious one, and it is difficult to get residents to take the ownership and responsibility of recycling.

“Waste segregation has remained mere lip service. While everyone likes the concept, people are hesitant in take it up,” Yadav said.

Residents, however, said that several larger housing societies would begin segregating waste if there was infrastructure to help them do it. Residents said they are willing to take responsibility of segregation, but want the authority to ensure collection and disposal, both in terms of cost and resources.

“Installing composting machines is the duty of the municipal authority. Why would any RWA pay 25% of the cost? There would be an additional recurring cost of electricity and salaries of the waste collection workers. Besides, if they are installed within societies, the neighbouring residents would be troubled by the odour,” A N Dhawan, secretary general, Federation of Noida Residents’ Welfare Association (FONRWA), said.

He added that the collection procedure was also not clear and the burden of sanitation workers’ salaries would also fall on the RWAs. This would make the whole process of waste disposal cumbersome for residents.

According to the Solid Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 2016, all gated housing societies, hotels and commercial institutions with an area of 5,000 square metres and above have to segregate biodegradable waste at source within their premises.

Environmentalists say this is based on the “polluter pays principle” in environmental law, accepted across the world.

First Published: Mar 17, 2018 22:29 IST