Inside the extraordinary, glittering infinity rooms of Yayoi Kusama

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST 9 Photos
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A man views the exhibit ‘Infinity Mirrored Room - The Souls of a Million Light Years Away’ by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, U.S. The artist is known for creating interactive optical illusions with vibrant colours and contrast leading to an unparalleled viewing experience for art lovers. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

A man views the exhibit ‘Infinity Mirrored Room - The Souls of a Million Light Years Away’ by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, U.S. The artist is known for creating interactive optical illusions with vibrant colours and contrast leading to an unparalleled viewing experience for art lovers. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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People inside ‘The Obliteration Room’.The rooms use facing mirrors, hanging lights and polka dots to create vistas of infinite regress. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

People inside ‘The Obliteration Room’.The rooms use facing mirrors, hanging lights and polka dots to create vistas of infinite regress. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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View of ‘Infinity Mirrored Room - All the Eternal Love I Have for Pumpkins’. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

View of ‘Infinity Mirrored Room - All the Eternal Love I Have for Pumpkins’. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away because the installation gives an illusion of a galaxy and the vastness of the universe. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away because the installation gives an illusion of a galaxy and the vastness of the universe. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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A new art exhibit by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. is attracting record crowds. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

A new art exhibit by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. is attracting record crowds. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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Each room has mirrors on every wall, creating endless reflections, but is filled with different objects, each with different meanings. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

Each room has mirrors on every wall, creating endless reflections, but is filled with different objects, each with different meanings. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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People view the exhibit ‘Dots Obsession - Love Transformed Into Dots’ by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at the Hirshhorn Museum . (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

People view the exhibit ‘Dots Obsession - Love Transformed Into Dots’ by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at the Hirshhorn Museum . (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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People view the exhibit ‘Infinity Room - Phalli's Field’.The visitors are invited to contemplate their existence while surrounded by a galactic atmosphere reminiscent of stars in the night sky. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

People view the exhibit ‘Infinity Room - Phalli's Field’.The visitors are invited to contemplate their existence while surrounded by a galactic atmosphere reminiscent of stars in the night sky. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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Kusama, 87 is best known for the dizzying patterns in her installations. She has been living in a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo since 1977, continues to make her artwork. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

Kusama, 87 is best known for the dizzying patterns in her installations. She has been living in a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo since 1977, continues to make her artwork. (Joshua Roberts / Reuters)

PUBLISHED ON APR 27, 2017 11:40 AM IST
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