Photos: Indonesia chomps down on food waste one wedding at a time

Updated On Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

Indonesia ranks just second in the world, behind only Saudi Arabia in terms of food wastage. Each year, its 260 million citizens end up trashing about 300kgs of food each. This comes at a time when the country’s fights with poverty and malnutrition. In the slums of Jakarta, Indonesia’s poor are now getting a taste of how the other half live thanks to a new food bank and charity programme that aims to take a bite out of the country’s mammoth food-waste problem.

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Volunteers of the programme “A Blessing to Share” carry containers with uneaten food as they distribute leftovers in a slum area in Jakarta. In the slums of Jakarta, Indonesia’s poor are getting a taste of how the other half live thanks to this new programme that aims to take a bite out of the country’s mammoth food-waste problem. (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

Volunteers of the programme “A Blessing to Share” carry containers with uneaten food as they distribute leftovers in a slum area in Jakarta. In the slums of Jakarta, Indonesia’s poor are getting a taste of how the other half live thanks to this new programme that aims to take a bite out of the country’s mammoth food-waste problem. (Adek Berry / AFP)

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A guest puts food on her plate during a wedding at a hotel in Jakarta. Even as it struggles with poverty and malnutrition, the Southeast Asian nation bins more edible food per person than any other country except Saudi Arabia, according to an Economist Intelligence Unit survey last year. (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

A guest puts food on her plate during a wedding at a hotel in Jakarta. Even as it struggles with poverty and malnutrition, the Southeast Asian nation bins more edible food per person than any other country except Saudi Arabia, according to an Economist Intelligence Unit survey last year. (Adek Berry / AFP)

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A waiter packs uneaten food for distribution after a wedding in Jakarta. Indonesia’s 260 million citizens each throw out an average of almost 300 kilograms of food annually, ahead of the United States in third spot, the survey said. The country’s food waste problem can be partly chalked up to local hospitality, which calls for ample helpings at all celebrations. (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

A waiter packs uneaten food for distribution after a wedding in Jakarta. Indonesia’s 260 million citizens each throw out an average of almost 300 kilograms of food annually, ahead of the United States in third spot, the survey said. The country’s food waste problem can be partly chalked up to local hospitality, which calls for ample helpings at all celebrations. (Adek Berry / AFP)

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Hosts often err on the side of abundance, and many hungry revellers’ eyes are bigger than their stomachs -- meaning lots of uneaten food. Globally, about 30% of food produced every year is tossed out or spoiled -- about 1.3 billion tonnes -- which translates into some $1 trillion in economic costs, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Association. (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

Hosts often err on the side of abundance, and many hungry revellers’ eyes are bigger than their stomachs -- meaning lots of uneaten food. Globally, about 30% of food produced every year is tossed out or spoiled -- about 1.3 billion tonnes -- which translates into some $1 trillion in economic costs, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Association. (Adek Berry / AFP)

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volunteers of the programme A Blessing to Share unload uneaten food from a cart for distribution in a slum area. “There are lots of weddings in Indonesia and lots of extra food,” said programme founder Astrid Paramita. “And there are lots of hungry people unfortunately, so this programme is trying to close that gap between the rich and needy.” (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

volunteers of the programme A Blessing to Share unload uneaten food from a cart for distribution in a slum area. “There are lots of weddings in Indonesia and lots of extra food,” said programme founder Astrid Paramita. “And there are lots of hungry people unfortunately, so this programme is trying to close that gap between the rich and needy.” (Adek Berry / AFP)

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A volunteer of the programme wheels a trolley distributing uneaten food in a Jakarta slum. So far the programme is fairly limited, but Parmita has big plans and hopes to expand to other cities and also start sourcing edibles from company meetings and conferences. (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

A volunteer of the programme wheels a trolley distributing uneaten food in a Jakarta slum. So far the programme is fairly limited, but Parmita has big plans and hopes to expand to other cities and also start sourcing edibles from company meetings and conferences. (Adek Berry / AFP)

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An elderly woman receives food from A Blessing to Share, in a slum area in Jakarta. Since starting in November, about 50 weddings have participated in the programme with about 1.6 tons of food collected for distribution through a local food bank. (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

An elderly woman receives food from A Blessing to Share, in a slum area in Jakarta. Since starting in November, about 50 weddings have participated in the programme with about 1.6 tons of food collected for distribution through a local food bank. (Adek Berry / AFP)

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For 60-year-old scavenger Efendi, getting a meal from one couple’s lavish nuptials across town was a welcome surprise. “I didn’t expect this -- suddenly I’m getting free food,” he said. (Adek Berry / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 21, 2018 11:36 AM IST

For 60-year-old scavenger Efendi, getting a meal from one couple’s lavish nuptials across town was a welcome surprise. “I didn’t expect this -- suddenly I’m getting free food,” he said. (Adek Berry / AFP)

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