Photos: Mosul’s long road to recovery after thwarting ISIS

As a long strenuous period marred by violence came to an end for civilians of Mosul, the journey to peace and normalcy in life has just begun with many challenges ahead.

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST 10 Photos
1 / 10
The July 9, 2017 announcement by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi of the state forces’ victory over the Islamic state by means of capturing Mosul brought and end to the three year long siege over the city by the self-proclaimed ‘Caliphate’. While a strenuous period marred by violence came to an end for civilians, the journey to peace and normalcy in life has just begun for the nearly one million displaced from the city. (AFP)

The July 9, 2017 announcement by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi of the state forces’ victory over the Islamic state by means of capturing Mosul brought and end to the three year long siege over the city by the self-proclaimed ‘Caliphate’. While a strenuous period marred by violence came to an end for civilians, the journey to peace and normalcy in life has just begun for the nearly one million displaced from the city. (AFP)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
2 / 10
A 100,000-strong alliance of Iraqi government units, Kurdish Peshmerga fighters and Shi’ite militias launched an offensive in October 2016 to recapture the northern city from Islamic State hold, with key air and ground support from a U.S.-led coalition. Inching forward over months, the coalition saw major gains in the liberation of the Eastern part of the city early this year, culminating in a complete takeover in July. (Suhaib Salem / REUTERS)

A 100,000-strong alliance of Iraqi government units, Kurdish Peshmerga fighters and Shi’ite militias launched an offensive in October 2016 to recapture the northern city from Islamic State hold, with key air and ground support from a U.S.-led coalition. Inching forward over months, the coalition saw major gains in the liberation of the Eastern part of the city early this year, culminating in a complete takeover in July. (Suhaib Salem / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
3 / 10
Following the announcement of victory by the US-led coalition after a final push in June and early July, state authorities were faced with the risky task of clearing captured territory of booby-traps, mines and other explosive devices left by retreating IS forces in anticipation of the tightening noose on Mosul. (REUTERS)

Following the announcement of victory by the US-led coalition after a final push in June and early July, state authorities were faced with the risky task of clearing captured territory of booby-traps, mines and other explosive devices left by retreating IS forces in anticipation of the tightening noose on Mosul. (REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
4 / 10
According to the UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, the battle for Mosul also involved the largest civilian evacuation from an urban war since World War II. Nearly one million people were assisted out of the city, now displaced and residing in camps, faced with a pressing need for shelter, food and medical services. (Khalid al Mousily / REUTERS)

According to the UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, the battle for Mosul also involved the largest civilian evacuation from an urban war since World War II. Nearly one million people were assisted out of the city, now displaced and residing in camps, faced with a pressing need for shelter, food and medical services. (Khalid al Mousily / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
5 / 10
A construction worker transports bricks for the reconstruction of destroyed building in the Old City of Mosul. (REUTERS)

A construction worker transports bricks for the reconstruction of destroyed building in the Old City of Mosul. (REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
6 / 10
University of Mosul students walk outside the campus in Mosul.In light of the extensive damage to the city, initial stabilisation of basic infrastructural facilities in Mosul which includes repairing water, sewage and electrical infrastructure as well as reopening schools and hospitals is estimated to cost over $1 billion. (Khalid al Mousily / REUTERS)

University of Mosul students walk outside the campus in Mosul.In light of the extensive damage to the city, initial stabilisation of basic infrastructural facilities in Mosul which includes repairing water, sewage and electrical infrastructure as well as reopening schools and hospitals is estimated to cost over $1 billion. (Khalid al Mousily / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
7 / 10
An Iraqi woman shops in the souk in the East of Mosul, Iraq. As coalition forces reached the eastern part of Mosul, retaking it earlier in the year life sprang back up with markets, vendors and businesses emerging along blown up, debris riddled streets. (REUTERS)

An Iraqi woman shops in the souk in the East of Mosul, Iraq. As coalition forces reached the eastern part of Mosul, retaking it earlier in the year life sprang back up with markets, vendors and businesses emerging along blown up, debris riddled streets. (REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
8 / 10
Mosul’s economy had stalled under IS rule with many government employees deprived of their salaries. This has left inhabitants with little money to spare and rebuild a new life. (REUTERS)

Mosul’s economy had stalled under IS rule with many government employees deprived of their salaries. This has left inhabitants with little money to spare and rebuild a new life. (REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
9 / 10
Iraqi men play dominos at a cafe in the old city in west Mosul, one among growing sights of people foregoing the torment of past years and picking their lives back up. (SAFIN HAMED / AFP)

Iraqi men play dominos at a cafe in the old city in west Mosul, one among growing sights of people foregoing the torment of past years and picking their lives back up. (SAFIN HAMED / AFP)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
10 / 10
As life slowly recedes to normalcy, the residents of Mosul are still haunted by the dead bodies still buried under the rubble of the Old City. Mosul’s road to recovery however still seems a long arduous journey in the face of a collapsed economy and an ancient city left a shell of its former self. (Suhaib Salem / REUTERS)

As life slowly recedes to normalcy, the residents of Mosul are still haunted by the dead bodies still buried under the rubble of the Old City. Mosul’s road to recovery however still seems a long arduous journey in the face of a collapsed economy and an ancient city left a shell of its former self. (Suhaib Salem / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 10, 2017 10:25 AM IST
SHARE
Story Saved