Photos: NASA project reveals global warming impact on half of Greenland

NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project has pointed to Greenland's ice sheet being far more susceptible to global warming than ever before.

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST 9 Photos
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NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project is expected to pave the way for improved estimates of sea level rise and observe changing water temperatures on the continental shelf surrounding Greenland. The project has revealed that the Greenland ice sheet is far more exposed to the planet’s warming oceans than previously known and has more ice, not recognized until now. (Courtesy NASA)

NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project is expected to pave the way for improved estimates of sea level rise and observe changing water temperatures on the continental shelf surrounding Greenland. The project has revealed that the Greenland ice sheet is far more exposed to the planet’s warming oceans than previously known and has more ice, not recognized until now. (Courtesy NASA)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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The submerged section of an iceberg is illuminated in the Nuup Kangerlua fjord near Nuuk in Greenland. A study, published in the Geophysical Research Letters, pulls together a body of evidence that measures the depth and contours of the ocean floor both beneath liquid water in Greenland’s fjords. (David Goldman / AP)

The submerged section of an iceberg is illuminated in the Nuup Kangerlua fjord near Nuuk in Greenland. A study, published in the Geophysical Research Letters, pulls together a body of evidence that measures the depth and contours of the ocean floor both beneath liquid water in Greenland’s fjords. (David Goldman / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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Researchers have found that Greenland contains more mass of ice than previously estimated and is capable of raising sea levels by almost 24 feet. (Courtesy NASA)

Researchers have found that Greenland contains more mass of ice than previously estimated and is capable of raising sea levels by almost 24 feet. (Courtesy NASA)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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Even more significant revelations from the study include the vulnerability of the amount of ice to rising temperature. More than 50% of the ice-sheets in Greenland are exposed to global warming. (Courtesy Nasa)

Even more significant revelations from the study include the vulnerability of the amount of ice to rising temperature. More than 50% of the ice-sheets in Greenland are exposed to global warming. (Courtesy Nasa)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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A cloud of smoke is seen from wildfires burning in Greenland. Although it was not clear, a lack of documented lightning prior to its ignition suggests that the fire was probably triggered by human activity. (AFP PHOTO / NOAA/ HANDOUT)

A cloud of smoke is seen from wildfires burning in Greenland. Although it was not clear, a lack of documented lightning prior to its ignition suggests that the fire was probably triggered by human activity. (AFP PHOTO / NOAA/ HANDOUT)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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Terminus of the melting Zachariæ Isstrøm glacier in Greenland, as seen from 28,000 feet during an Operation IceBridge flight. Operation IceBridge is another NASA mission that maps and charts the melt of land ice over the poles. (NASA / LVIS TEAM)

Terminus of the melting Zachariæ Isstrøm glacier in Greenland, as seen from 28,000 feet during an Operation IceBridge flight. Operation IceBridge is another NASA mission that maps and charts the melt of land ice over the poles. (NASA / LVIS TEAM)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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A humpback whale dives while swimming in the Nuup Kangerlua fjord near Nuuk in Greenland. ‘People are so far removed from the Arctic that they don't understand it, they don't know it and they don't love it,’ said Paula von Weller, a field biologist. ‘I think it's important for people to see what's here and to fall in love with it and have a bond and want to protect it.’ (David Goldman / AP)

A humpback whale dives while swimming in the Nuup Kangerlua fjord near Nuuk in Greenland. ‘People are so far removed from the Arctic that they don't understand it, they don't know it and they don't love it,’ said Paula von Weller, a field biologist. ‘I think it's important for people to see what's here and to fall in love with it and have a bond and want to protect it.’ (David Goldman / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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Icebergs float in a fjord after calving off from glaciers on the Greenland ice sheet. The ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world, which covers roughly 80 percent of the country, has been retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. (David Goldman / AP)

Icebergs float in a fjord after calving off from glaciers on the Greenland ice sheet. The ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world, which covers roughly 80 percent of the country, has been retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. (David Goldman / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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The studies are reminiscent of Greenland’s very topography that is melting and undergoing changes before our eyes, while adversely affecting the earth’s climate. (Courtesy NASA)

The studies are reminiscent of Greenland’s very topography that is melting and undergoing changes before our eyes, while adversely affecting the earth’s climate. (Courtesy NASA)

UPDATED ON OCT 06, 2017 12:52 PM IST
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