Photos: Storm Ophelia batters UK and Ireland; leaves 3 dead

Storm Ophelia is expected to cause further disruption in Great Britain today after three people died in hurricane-force winds which damaged electricity networks and brought the transport network to a standstill in Ireland on Monday.

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST 9 Photos
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Huge waves strike the harbor wall and lighthouse at Porthcawl, South Wales, on October 16, 2017 as Storm Ophelia, downgraded from a hurricane arrives in the UK and Ireland. Ophelia ramming Ireland on Monday left three people dead, 330,000 homes and businesses without power, the shutting of schools and the grounding of planes in the country. (Geoff Caddick / AFP)

Huge waves strike the harbor wall and lighthouse at Porthcawl, South Wales, on October 16, 2017 as Storm Ophelia, downgraded from a hurricane arrives in the UK and Ireland. Ophelia ramming Ireland on Monday left three people dead, 330,000 homes and businesses without power, the shutting of schools and the grounding of planes in the country. (Geoff Caddick / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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Kite surfers brave the winds in Quiberon, western France as gusts of 80 mph (130 kph) were reported. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar urged people to stay indoors until the storm passed with the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, warning those outdoors that as tempting as it is to watch tides crashing, it wasn’t worth the risk of being struck by large waves. (Loic Venance / AFP)

Kite surfers brave the winds in Quiberon, western France as gusts of 80 mph (130 kph) were reported. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar urged people to stay indoors until the storm passed with the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, warning those outdoors that as tempting as it is to watch tides crashing, it wasn’t worth the risk of being struck by large waves. (Loic Venance / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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Waves batter the coast as Storm Ophelia hits the County Clare town of Lahinch, Ireland. Hurricane-force gusts were reported 30 years to the day after a weather event dubbed the ‘Great Storm of 1987’ battered southern England. Ireland’s National Emergency Coordination Group on Severe Weather warned that the storm is still ‘unprecedented, with serious life-threatening conditions.’ (Clodagh Kilcoyne / REUTERS)

Waves batter the coast as Storm Ophelia hits the County Clare town of Lahinch, Ireland. Hurricane-force gusts were reported 30 years to the day after a weather event dubbed the ‘Great Storm of 1987’ battered southern England. Ireland’s National Emergency Coordination Group on Severe Weather warned that the storm is still ‘unprecedented, with serious life-threatening conditions.’ (Clodagh Kilcoyne / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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A plane flies past the Shard in central London as the sky takes on an unusual ochre yellow colour caused by Storm Ophelia picking up sand from the Sahara desert and dust from wildfires in Portugal as its winds gained force. (Dominic Lipinski / PA via AP)

A plane flies past the Shard in central London as the sky takes on an unusual ochre yellow colour caused by Storm Ophelia picking up sand from the Sahara desert and dust from wildfires in Portugal as its winds gained force. (Dominic Lipinski / PA via AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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A man struggles against the wind on Mount Charles pier ahead of Hurricane Ophelia in Donegal, Ireland. Ireland’s weather service, Met Eireann, described the storm as the most powerful on record to have ever been this far east in the Atlantic. The government issued its most severe red weather warning whilst amber warnings remained in place for Northern Ireland and parts of Wales. (Charles McQuillan / Getty Images)

A man struggles against the wind on Mount Charles pier ahead of Hurricane Ophelia in Donegal, Ireland. Ireland’s weather service, Met Eireann, described the storm as the most powerful on record to have ever been this far east in the Atlantic. The government issued its most severe red weather warning whilst amber warnings remained in place for Northern Ireland and parts of Wales. (Charles McQuillan / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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Girls throw leaves opposite the Houses of Parliament during a reddish sky caused by remnants of Ophelia on October 16, 2017 in London. This movement of air from the continent also brought in warmer temperatures, including highs of up to 22 degrees Celsius in parts of southern England, including London. (Carl Court / Getty Images)

Girls throw leaves opposite the Houses of Parliament during a reddish sky caused by remnants of Ophelia on October 16, 2017 in London. This movement of air from the continent also brought in warmer temperatures, including highs of up to 22 degrees Celsius in parts of southern England, including London. (Carl Court / Getty Images)

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A man attempts a selfie during storm Ophelia in the County Clare town of Lahinch, Ireland. As the storm moves toward Northern Ireland with more to come Tuesday, workers sealed off the Peace Bridge in Londonderry as a precautionary measure. Flights and ferries were cancelled in parts of Scotland and authorities warned of coastal flooding in the southwest. (Clodagh Kilcoyne / REUTERS)

A man attempts a selfie during storm Ophelia in the County Clare town of Lahinch, Ireland. As the storm moves toward Northern Ireland with more to come Tuesday, workers sealed off the Peace Bridge in Londonderry as a precautionary measure. Flights and ferries were cancelled in parts of Scotland and authorities warned of coastal flooding in the southwest. (Clodagh Kilcoyne / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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People walk through Canary Wharf while the sky overhead turns ochre over London. Apart from the unusual skies, several EasyJet flights to British airports were diverted due to unusual odors on board thought to be associated with the unusual ‘atmospheric conditions’. British Airways had similar reports but operated its flights normally. Officials at Liverpool John Lennon Airport said that the conditions caused some flight redirections. (Tom Jacobs / REUTERS)

People walk through Canary Wharf while the sky overhead turns ochre over London. Apart from the unusual skies, several EasyJet flights to British airports were diverted due to unusual odors on board thought to be associated with the unusual ‘atmospheric conditions’. British Airways had similar reports but operated its flights normally. Officials at Liverpool John Lennon Airport said that the conditions caused some flight redirections. (Tom Jacobs / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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A worker clears fallen trees off a road with a chainsaw during Storm Ophelia in the County Clare area of the Burren, Ireland. ‘There are still dangers out there but the cleanup has started in some areas and the job of getting the country back to work has begun,’ the chairman of Ireland’s National Emergency Coordination Group said. (Clodagh Kilcoyne / REUTERS)

A worker clears fallen trees off a road with a chainsaw during Storm Ophelia in the County Clare area of the Burren, Ireland. ‘There are still dangers out there but the cleanup has started in some areas and the job of getting the country back to work has begun,’ the chairman of Ireland’s National Emergency Coordination Group said. (Clodagh Kilcoyne / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2017 12:31 PM IST
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