(From left to right) Anjali Shiras, Varsha Shepal, Meenaxi Setia speak about their paper on Noncoding RNA.(SANKET WANKHADE/ HT PHOTO)
(From left to right) Anjali Shiras, Varsha Shepal, Meenaxi Setia speak about their paper on Noncoding RNA.(SANKET WANKHADE/ HT PHOTO)

Pune scholars decode one more factor that can cause cancer

The findings of the Indian researchers highlighting that GINIR plays an important role in the development of cancer was published in the international journal, PLoS Biology, on October 12.
Hindustan Times, Pune | By Nozia Sayyed
UPDATED ON OCT 17, 2018 02:49 PM IST

Researchers from National centre for cell science (NCCS), Pune, and Kalinga institute of industrial technology (KIIT), Bhubaneswar, have found that increased levels of long coding RNA, ‘GINIR’ (name of the RNA) can lead to abrupt cell growth resulting in fast tumour formation in the body.

The decade-long study using the mouse model system has established the role of GINIR RNA in tumour formation. “Cancer is one of the most dreaded diseases and genes responsible for it are also well-studied today. However, nobody had studied and associated GINIR’s rising levels leading to tumour formation and being oncogenesis,” lead researcher and senior scientist from NCCS, Anjali Shiras said at a news conference in the city on Tuesday.

The findings of the Indian researchers highlighting that GINIR plays an important role in the development of cancer was published in the international journal, PLoS Biology, on October 12.

“We are now working towards understanding the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of expression of the GINIR RNA in the cells. We are also trying to understand how controlled and balanced expression of GINIR could keep the growth of cells in check, thus preventing their uncontrolled growth and multiplication. The knowledge gained from these studies will help in designing improved methods for the detection, management and treatment of cancer,” Shiras said.

LC Padhy, the collaborating scientist from KIIT, Bhubaneshwar, said their study revealed that RNA molecule when supplied in very large amounts to the cells in the body can lead to oncogenesis.

“We found that in melanoma cells, GINIR was found to be present in higher amounts. It was also found that when the cells had high levels of GINIR in them they turned into malignant cells with metastatic properties. We are now trying to identify the regulation of oncogenesis of these RNAs in human cancer cells which may help us in providing new avenues to look at melanoma cancers or may even provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat metastatic melanoma,” said Padhy, formerly a leading scientist at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai.

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