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Sculptures brought to life at Chandigarh Arts college left to fate in open

Covered with dust and fungus, most sculptures have been kept in a corner on the campus

punjab Updated: Oct 11, 2018 14:45 IST
Srishti Jaswal
Srishti Jaswal
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
Sculptures,Chandigarh,Chandigarh Arts college
Sculptures kept in a corner at the Government College of Art, Sector 10, in Chandigarh on Wednesday. (HT Photo)

As part of the curriculum, students of Government College of Art, Sector 10, make sculptures every year. However, the sculptures are left out in the open to decay as there is no space to accommodate the art pieces.

Covered with dust and fungus, most sculptures have been kept in a corner on the campus. Students, who put their sweat and money to bring these sculptures to life, say college does not have adequate infrastructure to preserve their sculptures. Students add that their sculptures should either be exhibited or auctioned.

Danish Khan, a student of Government College of Art, says, “As a part of the curriculum, students are supposed to make a sculpture every month. After attending the basic foundation course, students of third and fourth year invest their time and money in life studies.”

As part of the curriculum, the students are required to make five projects in a semester, which round up to 10 sculptures in a year. Each sculpture carries 100 marks. The cost and preparation time of a each sculpture varies.

Student spend Rs 5,000 on one sculpture

Students make use of fiber casting, wood, stone, metal, terracotta to make sculptures. Students say it takes more than a month and around ₹5,000 to bring a sculpture to life. For mediums such as stone, metal and wood, the sculpting process can take more than three months.

Gurinder Singh, a student, says, “Some students make such beautiful sculptures. But there is no space or method to preserve art pieces. Every year, more and more sculptures are left out in the open to decay.”

Gurvinder, a student, said, “It will be great if we can sell our sculptures. We can finance new projects with the money.”

Simarjeet Singh, a student, says, “When I was young, I was attracted towards the smell of earth and stones. At present, I am working with the two mediums to make sculptures. The process of making a sculpture is bliss.”

IAS officer Sachin Rana, principal of the college, says, “ We have kept the sculptures out in the open as the college does not have adequate infrastructure to preserve the artworks.”

“We do not planned any auction or exhibition. If given the option, we will hold such events as it will help generate revenue for college,” he adds.

First Published: Oct 11, 2018 14:45 IST