Who says ISRO scientists need expensive private school education? | punjab | chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Who says ISRO scientists need expensive private school education?

The education department move comes as an increasing number of parents are choosing private schools hoping for better educational opportunities for their children.

punjab Updated: Feb 27, 2018 12:49 IST
Arshdeep Arshi
Arshdeep Arshi
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh

You don’t have to go to an expensive private school to be an ISRO scientist, a civil servant or a professor at a top global college. That’s the message the education department wants to convey to those who care to listen as it puts together data of eminent alumni of government schools to counter the growing popularity and number of private schools.

The list is definitely impressive. Alok Singh, a scientist at ISRO studied in Government Model Senior Secondary School (GMSSS), Sector 35. Dr Paras Anand, an alumnus of GMSSS, Sector 16, is now a lecturer at the department of medicine at Imperial College, London. Sujata Saunik, from GMSSS, Sector 10, is an IAS officer and principal secretary, department of financial reforms, government of Maharashtra.

The education department move comes as an increasing number of parents are choosing private schools hoping for better educational opportunities for their children.

Deputy director (adult education – 1) Rajinder Kaur says, “We wish students to know that government schools too have produced successful alumni, who went on to become successful civil service officers, judges, doctors, engineers and professionals.”

“This will not only motivate students but the teachers too, who are at present teaching in government schools,” she adds.

“Though the response to admission in senior classes has always been good in government schools, the enrolment in primary and elementary classes has decreased,” says former deputy director school education (DDSE), Chanchal Singh.

The reason for this he feels is that private schools advertise their achievements but the government schools don’t. “It is good that education department is collecting this data to tell people that government schools are also providing good education,” Singh adds.

“In the old times, students from different sections of society used to go to one school because of which all students felt they were equals,” says Rajinder Kaur.

The education department is collecting data of alumni from 1990 onwards. So far, details have been collected of nearly 300 alumni who are working as IAS, PCS, and IPS officials, civil judges, educationists, doctors, businessmen, and professionals.

Sunita Kapoor, a senior counsellor at GMSSS, Sector 40, has been given the task of collecting the data and government schools have also created Facebook pages for the purpose.