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Home / World News / 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for development of a method for genome editing

2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for development of a method for genome editing

The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for development of a method for genome editing.

world Updated: Oct 07, 2020, 15:37 IST
Associated Press | Posted by Shankhyaneel Sarkar
Associated Press | Posted by Shankhyaneel Sarkar
This file photo taken on October 23, 2015 shows French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna on the stage after receiving the 2015 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Reseach from Spain's King Felipe during the Princess of Asturias awards ceremony at the Campoamor Theatre in Oviedo.
This file photo taken on October 23, 2015 shows French researcher in Microbiology, Genetics and Biochemistry Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and US professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology, Jennifer Doudna on the stage after receiving the 2015 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Reseach from Spain's King Felipe during the Princess of Asturias awards ceremony at the Campoamor Theatre in Oviedo.(AFP)

French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing known as CRISPR.

The recipients were announced Wednesday in Stockholm by Goran Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

The prestigious award comes with a gold medal and prize money of 10 million krona (more than $1.1 million), courtesy of a bequest left more than a century ago by the prize’s creator, Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel. The amount was increased recently to adjust for inflation.

On Monday, the Nobel Committee awarded the prize for physiology and medicine to Americans Harvey J. Alter and Charles M. Rice and British-born scientist Michael Houghton for discovering the liver-ravaging hepatitis C virus. Tuesday’s prize for physics went to Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the United States for their breakthroughs in understanding the mysteries of cosmic black holes.

The other prizes are for outstanding work in the fields of literature, peace and economics.

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