MP raises Jallianwala Bagh massacre in UK House of Commons | world news | Hindustan Times
  • Monday, Jun 18, 2018
  •   °C  
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 18, 2018-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

MP raises Jallianwala Bagh massacre in UK House of Commons

Hundreds were killed when troops from the British Indian Army led by Brig Reginald Dyer opened fire on unarmed protesters at Jallianwala Bagh on April 13, 1919.

world Updated: Mar 15, 2018 20:20 IST
Prasun Sonwalkar
File photo of Labour MP Virendra Sharma (centre) with foreign secretary Boris Johnson.
File photo of Labour MP Virendra Sharma (centre) with foreign secretary Boris Johnson.(Courtesy Labour Party)

Senior Labour MP Virendra Sharma has asked Prime Minister Theresa May to join him and others to commemorate the 99th anniversary of the Jallianwala Bagh massacre next month.

Jalandhar-origin Sharma asked May during Prime Minister’s Question Time: “This year, April 13 represents the 99th anniversary of what happened at the Jallianwala Bagh in Amritsar, India, known as the Jallianwala Bagh massacre, in which more than 1,000 peaceful protesters were murdered by soldiers under the command of General Dyer.

“Will the Prime Minister join me in commemorating the massacre and meet me and others who are campaigning for this shameful episode to be remembered across the UK?”

May replied: “The honourable gentleman has raised a very specific issue and a very specific point. I will be happy to look at the question he has raised and respond to him in writing.”

There have been demands in the past that Britain tender an apology for the Jallianwala Bagh massacre.

As prime minister, David Cameron visited the memorial in Punjab in 2013 and described it as a “deeply shameful event”, but did not apologise, saying: “I think the right thing is to acknowledge what happened, to recall what happened, to show respect and understanding for what happened.”

Hundreds were killed when troops from the British Indian Army led by Brig Reginald Dyer opened fire on unarmed protesters at Jallianwala Bagh on April 13, 1919.

A British commission that conducted an inquiry into the incident concluded 379 people were killed but Indian leaders estimated up to 1,000 people had died in the firing.