In India 6/10 test-tube babies born of infertile men | india | Hindustan Times
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In India 6/10 test-tube babies born of infertile men

The latest findings turn on its head findings five years ago, as also the myth of female infertility, which is the source of much domestic violence and abuse. Alifiya Khan reports.

india Updated: Sep 18, 2008 00:05 IST
Alifiya Khan

The Indian male is taking a hit, and well below his belt.

Male infertility was behind 56 per cent of test-tube babies compared with 34 per cent among females, according to data collected in 2006 from 116 fertility clinics across India and to be officially released in Mumbai on September 20.

The latest findings turn on its head findings five years ago, as also the myth of female infertility, which is the source of much domestic violence and abuse. In 2001, female infertility caused 62 per cent of test-tube babies, while male impotence accounted for 38 per cent.

Doctors say male infertility, especially in cities, is certain to have grown even more by now.

A copy of the findings of the National ART (artificial reproductive techniques) Registry of India (NARI) survey, conducted by the Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecological Societies of India (FOGSI) and the Indian Society for Assisted Reproduction, is exclusively available with Hindustan Times.

“Late marriages, reduction in sperm count because of pollution, tight synthetic clothes are some of the urban factors responsible for the rise,” said Dr Ajit Vaze, andrologist at Jaslok, Saifee and Lilavati hospitals. “Smoking, drinking, erratic food patterns and work schedules also work against potency.”

With a flourishing modelling career and a pretty wife, 32-year-old Pritish Kumar (name changed), for instance, had just was one problem.

“They had been married for four years but couldn’t have a baby. His sperm count was extremely low. After treatment, they got a baby in four months,” said in-vitro fertilisation expert Dr Gautam Allahabadia. “In most such cases, male infertility is dominant reason for treatment.”