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Interview: Harish Mehta, author, The Maverick Effect – “Technology is like bottled lightening”

One of India’s earliest tech entrepreneurs talks about the contribution of NASSCOM, the impact of the IT Revolution, and the influence of Jain teaching What made you write this book? India’s economy has ballooned in the last few decades, and the seminal role played by the IT industry, which contributes almost 10% of the country’s GDP, has not been properly acknowledged
Author Harish Mehta (Courtesy the publisher)
Author Harish Mehta (Courtesy the publisher)
Updated on Jun 10, 2022 10:39 PM IST
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BySaaz Aggarwal

Review: Thinking with Ghalib: Poetry for a New Generation byAnjum Altaf and Amit Basole

This is the perfect volume for those looking to enter the world of Urdu poetry or Ghalib in particular, without learning Urdu
Urdu poet Mirza Ghalib's haveli near Chandni Chowk, New Delhi. (Getty)
Urdu poet Mirza Ghalib's haveli near Chandni Chowk, New Delhi. (Getty)
Updated on Jun 10, 2022 10:37 PM IST
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ByMaaz Bin Bilal

Review: The Line of Mercy by Tarun Tejpal

Author and journalist Tarun Tejpal, who wrote The Alchemy of Desire (2006), The Story of My Assassins (2010) and The Valley of Masks (2011) is back with a new novel called The Line of Mercy (2022)
Inside the iron bars. (Shutterstock)
Inside the iron bars. (Shutterstock)
Updated on Jun 10, 2022 10:43 PM IST
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ByChintan Girish Modi

Sanjay Chhel – ‘Filmmaking has become like defusing a bomb’

The screenwriter and director talks about working on 1990s classics like Rangeela and Yes Boss, lyric and dialogue writing, how the corporatization of Hindi films has killed some of the spontaneity, and offers some solid advice for aspiring young writers
Screenwriter and director Sanjay Chhel (Courtesy the subject)
Screenwriter and director Sanjay Chhel (Courtesy the subject)
Updated on Jun 10, 2022 03:48 PM IST
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ByMihir Chitre

‘The feminist future is in our grasp’ Sindhu R, author, Smashing the Patriarchy

The author of this guide for the 21st century Indian woman talks about the fearlessness of GenZ feminists, caste, the savarna gaze, feminism and humanistic capitalism
Ripped jeans and smashed patriarchy: Delhi Pradesh Mahila Congress workers protesting against former Uttarakhand chief minister Tirath Singh Rawat’s comment on women on March 19, 2021. (Sanjeev Verma/HT PHOTO)
Ripped jeans and smashed patriarchy: Delhi Pradesh Mahila Congress workers protesting against former Uttarakhand chief minister Tirath Singh Rawat’s comment on women on March 19, 2021. (Sanjeev Verma/HT PHOTO)
Updated on Jun 09, 2022 07:59 PM IST
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ByAvantika Mehta

Review: The Khan by Saima Mir

An unabashed depiction of South Asian life and society within the contemporary global context, The Khan is devoid of stereotypes, yet still true to its Muslim roots
A volatile landscape: London during riots in August 2011. (Shutterstock)
A volatile landscape: London during riots in August 2011. (Shutterstock)
Updated on Jun 09, 2022 12:22 PM IST
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ByPercy Bharucha

Review: The 24th Mile by Tehmton S Mistry

A narrative that combines a memoir with fiction to effectively tell the story of an Indian doctor’s heroism in war-torn Burma
Indian troops move ammunition in muddy conditions on the road to Tamu, Burma, in 1943. (Wikimedia Commons)
Indian troops move ammunition in muddy conditions on the road to Tamu, Burma, in 1943. (Wikimedia Commons)
Updated on Jun 08, 2022 07:44 PM IST
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ByPercy Bharucha

Excerpt: The Phantom Plague by Vidya Krishnan

This extract from a new book on tuberculosis combines reportage, storytelling and hard statistics to show that the graveness of the TB crisis in India is being underestimated
An elderly tuberculosis patient checks her X-ray at the Chest Disease Hospital in Srinagar, Kashmir. (Waseem Andrabi/Hindustan Times)
An elderly tuberculosis patient checks her X-ray at the Chest Disease Hospital in Srinagar, Kashmir. (Waseem Andrabi/Hindustan Times)
Updated on Jun 07, 2022 03:43 PM IST
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ByVidya Krishnan

Daisy Rockwell, Tomb of Sand: “People with big egos rarely go into translation”

Daisy Rockwell, who won the 2022 International Booker Prize with Geetanjali Shree, author of Ret Samadhi, talks about translation and more
Translator Daisy Rockwell delivers her acceptance speech after winning the 2022 International Booker Prize for her translation of Geetanjali Shree's 'Tomb of Sand' in London, Thursday, May 26, 2022. (David Cliff/AP)
Translator Daisy Rockwell delivers her acceptance speech after winning the 2022 International Booker Prize for her translation of Geetanjali Shree's 'Tomb of Sand' in London, Thursday, May 26, 2022. (David Cliff/AP)
Updated on Jun 09, 2022 08:58 PM IST
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ByChintan Girish Modi

Book Box: Celebrating Pride Month

  • Read these books to better understand the people around you, and discover yourself.
A few books to celebrate Pride Month. 
A few books to celebrate Pride Month. 
Published on Jun 04, 2022 02:28 PM IST
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HT Picks; New Reads

On the reading list this week is an alternative history of civilisation told through its outsiders, a new translation of one of the world’s great story collections, and a book that presents a path for those with a mental health condition
A book on how nomads have contributed to civilization, a new translation of a fascinating collection of stories, and a part memoir-part self-help book for those grappling with their mental health. (HT Team)
A book on how nomads have contributed to civilization, a new translation of a fascinating collection of stories, and a part memoir-part self-help book for those grappling with their mental health. (HT Team)
Updated on Jun 04, 2022 10:19 AM IST
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ByHT Team

Review: Adam by S Hareesh

S Hareesh’s fiction provides a parallel reading of the state of Kerala and its complex socio-cultural dynamics
Kerala, where the magical and the real constantly intersect. (Shutterstock)
Kerala, where the magical and the real constantly intersect. (Shutterstock)
Updated on Jun 04, 2022 01:09 AM IST
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ByKunal Ray

Interview: Geetanjali Shree - “I just have to be myself”

Author Geetanjali Shree on staying grounded in the wake of winning the International Booker Prize for Tomb of Sand
Author Geetanjali Shree, winner of the International Booker Prize 2022. (Sanjeev Verma/HT PHOTO)
Author Geetanjali Shree, winner of the International Booker Prize 2022. (Sanjeev Verma/HT PHOTO)
Published on Jun 04, 2022 01:04 AM IST
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ByChintan Girish Modi

Essay: Fun facts about board games in ancient India

In time for International Tabletop Day on June 4, Brishti Guha writes about the ancient Indian obsession with board games evident not only in archaeological finds but also in myth, literature and folklore
Playing chess in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh. (Shutterstock)
Playing chess in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh. (Shutterstock)
Updated on Jun 03, 2022 04:03 PM IST
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ByBrishti Guha

Review: Two and a Half Rivers by Anirudh Kala

A novel that weaves together the various political and cultural schisms that have affected Punjab and its people
Mustard fields in Ludhiana, Punjab. (Shutterstock)
Mustard fields in Ludhiana, Punjab. (Shutterstock)
Published on Jun 02, 2022 05:01 PM IST
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ByMaaz Bin Bilal

Review: Chillies, Chhana, Rasa – Heritage Foods of Bengal by Nina M Furstenau

The book contains a comprehensive study of traditional Bengali culinary culture and the ways in which this was affected by overseas commerce, such as the beginning of American trade in India
Colonisation transformed and gentrified some simple foods - khichuri as kedgeree became a breakfast dish in colonial India. (Shutterstock)
Colonisation transformed and gentrified some simple foods - khichuri as kedgeree became a breakfast dish in colonial India. (Shutterstock)
Updated on Jun 02, 2022 04:34 PM IST
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ByIndranee Ghosh

Review: The Other Man by Farhad J Dadyburjor

While the novel holds up a mirror to Indian society where gay men marry straight women to fulfill their patriarchal duty, it is also refreshing in that the queer characters are not condemned to persecution
LGBTQ activists celebrating after the Supreme Court of India struck down Section 377 on Thursday, September 6, 2018. (Arijit Sen/HT Photo)
LGBTQ activists celebrating after the Supreme Court of India struck down Section 377 on Thursday, September 6, 2018. (Arijit Sen/HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 01, 2022 05:00 PM IST
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ByChintan Girish Modi

Short story: The Photograph by Saadat Hasan Manto

This story from ‘The Collected Stories of Saadat Hasan Manto; Volume 1, Bombay and Poona’ translated by Nasreen Rehman displays the keen sense of dialogue that made the author a sought after “munshi” or screenwriter in the Bombay film industry of the pre-Partition era
Saadat Hasan Manto (Courtesy Aleph)
Saadat Hasan Manto (Courtesy Aleph)
Updated on May 31, 2022 08:30 PM IST
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BySaadat Hasan Manto translated by Nasreen Rehman

Review: Field Notes from a Waterborne Land by Parimal Bhattacharya

A blend of travelogue, memoir, and novel, this book tells stories of the district towns and remote villages of Bengal and Orissa, and of the people who live there
Boats on the Hooghly in West Bengal. (Subhendu Ghosh/HT Photo)
Boats on the Hooghly in West Bengal. (Subhendu Ghosh/HT Photo)
Updated on May 30, 2022 05:58 PM IST
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BySamrat Choudhury

Book Box: The book lover's guide to New York

  • Explore New York with these seven books, shop at an independent bookstore, and tour a literary tavern
A Book Lover's Guide to New York. 
A Book Lover's Guide to New York. 
Updated on May 28, 2022 05:13 PM IST
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HT Picks; New Reads

This week’s reading list includes a diplomat’s authoritative account of the India–China relationship and how China perceives our country, a nutritionist’s book on habits that can help us boost our immunity and give us the edge needed to beat whatever the universe throws at us, and a Princeton economist’s volume that shows how individuals, institutions, and nations can successfully navigate a dynamic, globalised economy filled with unknown risks
Our pick of the week’s good reads includes a book on how China perceives India, another on boosting immunity, and one on navigating the economy. (HT Team)
Our pick of the week’s good reads includes a book on how China perceives India, another on boosting immunity, and one on navigating the economy. (HT Team)
Published on May 27, 2022 10:56 PM IST
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ByHT Team

Interview: Arunava Sinha, Translator, winner of the 6th Vani Foundation Distinguished Translator Award 2022 – “I’m very hopeful for the future of translations”

On translating from Bangla into English and vice versa, and on choosing to translate writers who are closer to the margins than to the mainstream
Arunava Sinha (Courtesy the subject)
Arunava Sinha (Courtesy the subject)
Published on May 27, 2022 10:55 PM IST
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ByChintan Girish Modi

Review: A Nation to Protect by Priyam Gandhi-Mody

Over the past two years, very few heads of government anywhere in the world remained unscathed by the ravages of the worst pandemic the world had seen in a century
Medical professionals at the inauguration of the Sardar Patel Covid Care Centre and Hospital on June 27, 2020. (Vipin Kumar/HT PHOTO)
Medical professionals at the inauguration of the Sardar Patel Covid Care Centre and Hospital on June 27, 2020. (Vipin Kumar/HT PHOTO)
Updated on May 27, 2022 10:54 PM IST
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ByBaijayant ‘Jay’ Panda

Review: Towers of Silence by Berjis Desai

Berjis Desai’s novel follows a Parsi clan as they deal with dwindling finances, lecherous cousins, insipid husbands, dullard progeny, family curses, black magic, and the need to preserve the community’s way of life
Parsis at a fire temple in Mumbai. (Shutterstock)
Parsis at a fire temple in Mumbai. (Shutterstock)
Published on May 27, 2022 10:53 PM IST
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ByPercy Bharucha

Interview: Vijay Maurya, screenwriter: ‘Cinema needs talent and temperament’

The writer of Gully Boy, Tumhari Sulu and Chillar Party, among others, talks about the intricacies of dialogue writing, and why writers should subdue their egos
Vijay Maurya (Courtesy VM)
Vijay Maurya (Courtesy VM)
Updated on May 27, 2022 02:52 PM IST
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ByMihir Chitre

Review: America’s Wars by Thomas H Henriksen

Revisiting American hubris in a book that looks at US interventions in regime changes and insurgencies after the Cold War
Aerial view of destroyed Iraqi vehicles beside Highway 80 west of Kuwait City. The ‘Highway of Death ‘ was bombed by coalition forces led by the United States on February 27-28, 1991. (Shutterstock)
Aerial view of destroyed Iraqi vehicles beside Highway 80 west of Kuwait City. The ‘Highway of Death ‘ was bombed by coalition forces led by the United States on February 27-28, 1991. (Shutterstock)
Published on May 26, 2022 03:36 PM IST
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Andrey Kurkov, Ukrainian author – ‘Several writers are working as soldiers’

As the war in Ukraine continues, Andrey Kurkov, author of Death and the Penguin and Grey Bees, among other novels, talks about writers at the frontline, the rise of militant literature, and his country’s new-found appreciation for independence
Author Andrey Kurkov (Courtesy the subject)
Author Andrey Kurkov (Courtesy the subject)
Updated on May 25, 2022 05:00 PM IST
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ByPooja Bhula

Review: A History of Objects by Carlo Pizzati

Carlo Pizzati’s A History of Objects is a collection of 23 short stories, each one dedicated to a specific inanimate being which, in the course of the story, becomes a cog in the author’s storytelling machine
A flautist performs at his window for his neighbours in Brussels, Belgium, during the lockdown in 2020. This sort of communal form of art making like the “balcony and courtyard concerts” in his story, The Mask, appeals to Carlo Pizzati. (Shutterstock)
A flautist performs at his window for his neighbours in Brussels, Belgium, during the lockdown in 2020. This sort of communal form of art making like the “balcony and courtyard concerts” in his story, The Mask, appeals to Carlo Pizzati. (Shutterstock)
Updated on May 24, 2022 07:18 PM IST
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BySimar Bhasin

Review: Acrobat by Nabaneeta Dev Sen; Poems translated by Nandana Dev Sen

The late Nabaneeta Dev Sen is a vital figure in modern Bengali literature with more than a hundred books either written or edited by her to her credit and though she wrote a lot more prose, it was poetry that was the heartbeat of her writing
Nabaneeta Dev Sen in a picture dated 15 April 1971. (Chawla/HT Photo)
Nabaneeta Dev Sen in a picture dated 15 April 1971. (Chawla/HT Photo)
Updated on May 23, 2022 06:00 PM IST
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ByManohar Shetty
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Thursday, June 30, 2022