Music is my life, my joy: Pandit Madhup Mudgal

Published on Aug 08, 2022 08:03 PM IST

Classical music lovers of Chandigarh had an evening to remember with renowned classical vocalist Padma Shri Pandit Madhup Mudgal performing at Varsha Ritu Sangeet Sandhya

Renowned classical vocalist Padma Shri Pandit Madhup Mudgal (Photo: Ravi Kumar/HT)
Renowned classical vocalist Padma Shri Pandit Madhup Mudgal (Photo: Ravi Kumar/HT)

Classical music lovers of Chandigarh had an evening to remember with renowned classical vocalist Padma Shri Pandit Madhup Mudgal performing at Varsha Ritu Sangeet Sandhya.

The event was organised by the Indian National Theatre, in collaboration with the Durga Dass Foundation in the auditorium of Strawberry Fields High School, Sector 26 Chandigarh.

Indian National Theatre president Anil Nehru and honorary secretary Vinita Gupta said the concert was organised to celebrate the arrival of the monsoon with joyous Saawan-specific music, including melodies in Raag Malhar.

Pandit Madhup Mudgal learnt music from his father late Prof Vinay Chandra Maudgalya, and subsequently, from Vasant Thakar, Pandit Jasraj, and Pandit Kumar Gandharva, imbibing compositions of different styles.

“I have always been surrounded by music. Being born into a family of musicians I grew up in a musical environment. I had the opportunity to see the performances of some of the finest artistes including Pandit Omkarnath Thakur, Ali Akbar Khan, and Kumar Gandharva, throughout my childhood. So, it won’t be wrong to say that my life and my joy is music as this is what I know and understand the best,” says Mudgal.

On his attachment to the City Beautiful, the vocalist says, “I have a deep connection with Chandigarh as I’ve been visiting the city for decades now. People of the city are warm and welcoming, and have good taste in music.”

“I first performed here with my gurus, Pandit Jasraj and Kumar Gandharva. Then in 1982, I first performed solo in the city. So, I have fond memories of the place and visit at every opportunity I get,” he adds.

People say youth is not interested in classical music, but Mudgal doesn’t agree. He says that a decade back, interest in classical music had diminished, especially among the youth. But it’s gradually increasing now.

“Many youngsters are starting to understand its importance and entering the field. They have rediscovered its magic by listening to and learning classical music,” he says.

“I think many people have wrong expectations. You cannot expect the number of people who understand and enjoy classical music to be the same as the ones who like other popular genres like Bollywood music. Globally, it’s the same story – not as many people like chamber music or jazz as do pop,” he elaborates.

Classical music has more intricacies and requires a deeper understanding to enjoy it, he adds.

So what does it take to be a good artiste? “Any form of art, be it music, dance, or something else, cannot be treated with impatience. Here, it’s a constant learning process and requires an infinitesimal amount of patience, passion, dedication, and zeal to learn the form,” says Mudgal.

“If you expect to get instant fame and a lot of money as a classical singer or musician, you’re bound to be disappointed. You might have natural talent, but you need to refine and polish it through hard work and the will to learn. If you’re patient and make constant efforts, you are sure to get a taste of success,” he says.

Most people see the glitz and glamour of legendary musicians such as Ustad Zakir Hussain ji, but what they fail to see is the decades of struggle these artistes went through to reach that feat; they forget that these artistes went through a lot to be where they are, he adds.

On the future plans of Gandharva Mahavidyalaya, which was founded by his late father, he says they strive to promote various forms of music, and upcoming artistes.

“It’s a constant fight against the tide. While the world is moving forwards in leaps and bounds, the flow of music remains the same. So, we plan to continue imparting knowledge of quality music and ‘Hindustani sanskaar’ to our students,” he concludes.

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  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Subhashree Nanda is a Senior Content Producer. She edits for HT City, Punjab, J&K-Himachal and Haryana news desk of Hindustan Times. She occasionally writes on lifestyle, culture, etc.

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