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Home / Pune News / HT Scholarship Pune: ‘Don’t wait for the change, be the change yourself’

HT Scholarship Pune: ‘Don’t wait for the change, be the change yourself’

Look for solutions within you. Whatever change you would like to see has to start from you, said actor Shilpa Tulaskar at the event

pune Updated: Jan 24, 2020 16:23 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Pune
From left: Resident editor of HT Pune, Abhay Vaidya, moderated a panel discussion which featured award-winning director Sujay Dahake, actor Pushkar Jog, and actor Shilpa Tulaskar. The panel discussed tourism in India, a topic on which 150 shortlisted students had written an essay as well.
From left: Resident editor of HT Pune, Abhay Vaidya, moderated a panel discussion which featured award-winning director Sujay Dahake, actor Pushkar Jog, and actor Shilpa Tulaskar. The panel discussed tourism in India, a topic on which 150 shortlisted students had written an essay as well.(Shankar Narayan/HT PHOTO)

On Thursday, students from various schools in Pune sat attentively through a panel discussion that highlighted “India’s rich offerings in tourism and ways to increase tourism potential”, at the Nehru Memorial Hall, Camp.

Moderated by Abhay Vaidya, resident editor, Hindustan Times Pune, the panel featured actor Shilpa Tulaskar, actor-director Pushkar Jog and writer-director Sujay Dahake.

Issues addressed included problems faced by tourists, a lack of tourism awareness among citizens and the need to explore the country, as opposed to travelling abroad.

Responding to the moderator Abhay Vaidya’s question, “What do you think of the tourism offerings in the country?”, Tulaskar said, “As a country we have a lot of potential when it comes to tourism. However, we sell our tourism really low compared to other countries. We need to work on this aspect. We also have to focus on the safety of tourists when we talk about tourism.”

Jog spoke about the unexplored areas of the country.

“We do not promote India as a tourist country as much as we should. You pick any region and you will find a beautiful and scenic area to visit. I believe travelling is all about learning and exploring and it should start from your own country first,” he said.

Dahake pointed out that though India has several tourist spots, standardisation of several aspects makes it difficult and hampers the travel process. “For example, the number of speed breakers is high, and all of them are in different shapes. Also, as tourists we don’t really see the true idea of exploring. We still have to learn a lot in terms of travel and tourism.”

HT Pune resident editor Abhay Vaidya added, “We need better infrastructure and roads to ensure our travels are safe and enjoyable.”

On her childhood memories of travelling, Tulaskar said that she is grateful that her vacations meant going to her hometown in the Konkan. “I feel blessed that my hometown Vengurla (in Sindhudurg) is still untouched by commercial tourism making it an ideal vacation spot. I hope the new generation realises the need to first explore domestic holidays over international destinations,” she said.

In the Q&A session, a student asked, “How can one make a change and bring about a difference?”

Tulaskar responded, “Don’t wait for the change, be the change yourself. Look for solutions within you. Whatever change you would like to see has to start from you. Apart from blaming the system, one needs to have a moral and civic responsibility to ensure our surroundings are clean and we are not harming anyone.”

When asked if it is enough to just speak about issues the country faces, Dahake said, “When you speak up you are creating awareness. It is the first step. Everyone should be encouraged to speak up. In terms of helping tourism potential, I believe confrontation is necessary. If you see people littering, confront them; let them go back with a memory that they are doing it wrong. This way, awareness spreads.”