Gyanvapi case: Plaintiff moves court against carbon dating

Published on Sep 28, 2022 12:09 AM IST

The demand of carbon dating the structure that the Hindu side claimed to be a shivling was raised by the lawyers representing the other four plaintiffs during a hearing on September 22.

The court fixed September 29 for the hearing on the application. (PTI)
The court fixed September 29 for the hearing on the application. (PTI)

VARANASI:

Carbon dating the structure that Hindu plaintiffs have claimed is a shivling inside the Gyanvapi mosque in Varanasi would be disrespectful of religious sentiments, Rakhi Singh, one of the five Hindu plaintiffs in the legal battle, said in an application in a district court on Tuesday.

The proposal was anti religion and a mockery of the belief of all sanatani Hindus, Singh said. She also moved another application in the court to take possession of a statue in her possession, which she found during the restoration of Kashi Vishwanath temple as case property. It would be a major evidence in the Gyanvapi case, she said, without elaborating.

The demand of carbon dating raised by the other four plaintiffs was misconceived and could cause further damage to it, she said. “The examination technique will damage the holy Shivlinga, which will amount to disrespect. It will also hurt the sentiments of all Sanatanis,” said the application, which Jitendra Singh Bisen, chief of Vishwa Vedic Sanatan Sangh and representative of Singh, moved in the district court.

The demand of carbon dating the structure that the Hindu side claimed to be a shivling was raised by the lawyers representing the other four plaintiffs during a hearing on September 22, after which district judge Ajay Krishna Vishvesh had fixed September 29 as the next date of hearing in the matter.

Singh also moved another application to secure an ancient statue of lord Ganesha and goddess Lakshmi, which she said could be important evidence in the ongoing case. “The plaintiff came to know about the statute of lord Ganesha and goddess Lakshmi found during the expansion and beautification of Kashi Vishwanath temple. The statue appears to be thousands of years old, and could be important evidence in the ongoing case,” she said in her application.

The court fixed September 29 for the hearing on the application.

The Hindu plaintiffs had earlier claimed that a shivling was found close to a small reservoir used by Muslims to perform ritual ablutions before offering namaz at the Gyanvapi mosque. The mosque management, however, maintained it was part of the fountain system of the wazookhana.

Besides Singh, four other women plaintiffs in the case have sought permission for daily worship at the Maa Shringar Gauri Sthal located on the outer wall of the Gyanvapi mosque.

Hari Shankar Jain, lawyer for the other four women plaintiffs, has denied any split in opinion over the carbon dating test, saying that there were some people who thought that conducting carbon dating would further damage the shivling, or it was against the religion, which is not true. The court is yet to decide on the matter.

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