Sewage, water treatment plants may be mandatory for new buildings in Delhi | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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Sewage, water treatment plants may be mandatory for new buildings in Delhi

Delhi water minister Rajendra Pal Gautam said it may become mandatory for all new building complexes, including hospitals, schools, residential and government buildings to install micro water and sewage treatment plants. Without these systems, building plans won’t be sanctioned.

delhi Updated: Jul 20, 2017 10:13 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
Delhi Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia speaks at ’DILLI KI SOCH’, an annual forum on problems that Delhi faces. Delhi water minister Rajendra Pal Gautam also spoke at the meet. He said water and treatment plants may become mandatory for new buildings.
Delhi Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia speaks at ’DILLI KI SOCH’, an annual forum on problems that Delhi faces. Delhi water minister Rajendra Pal Gautam also spoke at the meet. He said water and treatment plants may become mandatory for new buildings.(Arvind Yadav/HT Photo)

The Delhi government is planning to make it mandatory for new building complexes to install water and sewage treatment plants.

“We would be floating the proposal in the next meeting of the Delhi Jal Board. It would be made mandatory for all new building complexes, including hospitals, schools, residential, commercial and government buildings, among others, to install micro water and sewage treatment plants. Without these systems, building plans won’t be sanctioned in the future,” said Rajendra Pal Gautam, Delhi water minister.

He was speaking at a program ‘Dilli ka Soch’ organised by the United Residents Joint Action (URJA) of Delhi on Wednesday.

“Small sewage treatment plants (STPs) and water treatment plants (WTPs) would not only be effective in treating a portion of the sewage and water at the source, but they will also cost nearly 50% less than the larger treatment plants which are now being installed,” he added.

Experts said that even though there some large sewage treatment plants in Delhi, the sludge and waste they produce after treating the sewage is not being utilised due to lack of proper technology.

“The sludge remains there and ultimately when the monsoon comes, the sludge mixes with the rain water and flows into the Yamuna. Due to lack of proper technology, this waste is not being utilised properly at present,” said Bhure Lal chairman of the Supreme Court empowered Environment Pollution (Prevention & Control) Authority.

The government is also planning to rope in experts and invite suggestions from the citizens on how to improve the quantity and quality of the supplied water.

“We would be soon giving advertisements in this regard. We want to invite suggestions from the citizens to provide them with clean and sufficient water and also on how to stop depletion of groundwater table,” the minister added.

Experts claimed that while some parts of Delhi enjoy abundant water supply there are a few pockets that don’t receive water for more than two weeks during the peak summer.

“People living in these areas have to store water for several days, which in turn gives rise to vector-borne diseases,” said Sujata Sunil, group leader of vector-borne diseases at International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology.

The Delhi Jal Board has made it mandatory for all new buildings, built on an area of more than 100 square metres and above or which discharge above 10,000 litres of water, to install a rainwater harvesting system.