The story of local successes in water management - Hindustan Times
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The story of local successes in water management

ByHT Editorial
Aug 12, 2021 08:04 PM IST

Clean water and sanitation, which Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been rightly focused on, including through the Jal Jeevan Mission, has enormous impact on both health, economy, gender equality and education

Clean water and sanitation, which Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been rightly focused on, including through the Jal Jeevan Mission, has enormous impact on both health, economy, gender equality and education. While Indore, Surat and Puri are outliers at the moment, they can provide a road map and encouragement for others to follow suit.

In India, accessibility to clean water and water pollution are two big challenges. Less than 50% of the population has access to safely managed drinking water. Water pollution is a serious problem as almost 70% of its surface water resources and a growing percentage of its groundwater reserves are contaminated by biological, toxic, organic, and inorganic pollutants, says an IDFC report. (sunil) PREMIUM
In India, accessibility to clean water and water pollution are two big challenges. Less than 50% of the population has access to safely managed drinking water. Water pollution is a serious problem as almost 70% of its surface water resources and a growing percentage of its groundwater reserves are contaminated by biological, toxic, organic, and inorganic pollutants, says an IDFC report. (sunil)

Indore in Madhya Pradesh was declared the first “water plus” city in the country under the Swachh Survekshan 2021, according to an announcement by the Centre. Surat in Gujarat has also received the same tag, which is provided to a city for maintaining cleanliness in rivers and drains under its administration. According to protocol provided by the Union ministry of housing and urban affairs, a city can be declared as “water plus” if it achieves three parameters: First, it must ensure that the dirty water from the city does not go into any river or drain; second, all public toilets must be connected to sewer lines and must be cleaned; and third, 30% of the city’s sewer water has to be recycled and reused. Earlier this month, another city, Puri (Odisha), achieved an important milestone: It became the first city to provide residents drink-from-tap facility, which means they can use water for cooking and drinking without filtration.

In India, accessibility to clean water and water pollution are two big challenges. Less than 50% of the population has access to safely managed drinking water. Water pollution is a serious problem as almost 70% of its surface water resources and a growing percentage of its groundwater reserves are contaminated by biological, toxic, organic, and inorganic pollutants, says an IDFC report.

Clean water and sanitation, which Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been rightly focused on, including through the Jal Jeevan Mission, has enormous impact on both health, economy, gender equality and education. While Indore, Surat and Puri are outliers at the moment, they can provide a road map and encouragement for others to follow suit.

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