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Home / Education / High court seeks DU’s reply over games removed from sports quota

High court seeks DU’s reply over games removed from sports quota

Justice C Hari Shankar issued the notice to Delhi University seeking to know its stand on a plea by 11 students who contended that the varsity had removed 12 games, including cycling, yoga, ball badminton, softball and archery.

education Updated: May 22, 2019 14:14 IST
Richa Banka
Richa Banka
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
Twelve games have been removed by the Delhi University and those seeking admissions in the sports quota under these games would not be eligible.
Twelve games have been removed by the Delhi University and those seeking admissions in the sports quota under these games would not be eligible. (HT File )

The Delhi high court Monday sought the response of the Delhi University on a plea by several students challenging the decision of the varsity to remove ball badminton and softball from the list of games for the sports quota.

Justice C Hari Shankar issued the notice to Delhi University seeking to know its stand on a plea by 11 students who contended that the varsity had removed 12 games, including cycling, yoga, ball badminton, softball and archery.

On May 14, Hindustan Times had first reported that 12 games have been removed by the Delhi University and those seeking admissions in the sports quota under these games would not be eligible. Five percent of all seats in each course is reserved under the sports quota.

In the plea filed through advocate Anil Gahlot, the students have contended that both ball badminton and softball are being played under the School Games Federation of India (SGFI), which is recognised by the Union ministry of youth affairs and sports and also by the International School Games Federation.

The plea, which will be next heard on August 20, also stated that both games are also a part of the Delhi Olympic Association.

“...both the games are played in 20-30 colleges, while game like kho-kho is being played in just 5-6 colleges,” the petition contended. The plea said the decision to remove the games is violative of the Constitution and sought quashing of the order.