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Home / India News / Two cyclones may co-exist in Arabian sea for a while

Two cyclones may co-exist in Arabian sea for a while

The second system might further intensify into a cyclone over three days. With Kyarr likely to dissipate only on November 2, the two cyclones might co-exist on the Arabian Sea.

india Updated: Oct 28, 2019, 23:59 IST
Anonna Dutt
Anonna Dutt
New Delhi
Even as super cyclonic storm Kyarr continues to move towards the Oman-Yemen coast, another low-pressure system over the Indian Ocean off the coast of Sri Lanka will strengthen and move towards the south Arabian Sea
Even as super cyclonic storm Kyarr continues to move towards the Oman-Yemen coast, another low-pressure system over the Indian Ocean off the coast of Sri Lanka will strengthen and move towards the south Arabian Sea(Hindustan Times)

Even as super cyclonic storm Kyarr continues to move towards the Oman-Yemen coast, another low-pressure system over the Indian Ocean off the coast of Sri Lanka will strengthen and move towards the south Arabian Sea, officials said.

The second system might further intensify into a cyclone over three days. With Kyarr likely to dissipate only on November 2, the two cyclones might co-exist on the Arabian Sea.

“From our predictions, it looks like both the cyclones will co-exist for some time. Normally, two strong systems like these do not even form in close proximity as they take away energy from each other. And, even when they form it is highly unlikely to co-exist, but it looks like that is what will happen,” said GP Sharma, vice-president of meteorology at private weather forecaster Skymet Weather Services.

The second low pressure system will come close to the south Peninsula near the Comorin area, where it will intensify into a depression by Tuesday afternoon. This will continue to bring rain to Kerala and south Tamil Nadu for at least another three days. Kerala has already received 54% excess rainfall since October 1, according to the data from the India Meteorology Department (IMD).

Kyarr had developed into a cyclone on Friday and intensified into a super cyclonic storm on Sunday.

This is the second super cyclonic storm ever to form over the Arabian Sea. “It is difficult to say how many such systems have developed in the past as the category of super cyclone was introduced in 1998. The first super cyclone recorded was the Odisha cyclone in 1999 that originated in Bay of Bengal. Another super cyclone Gonu originated in the Arabian Sea in 2007,” said Dr Mrityunjay Mohapatra, director general of IMD.

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