The squall hit Kolkata around 6:20 pm triggering rain.(ANI PHOTO.)
The squall hit Kolkata around 6:20 pm triggering rain.(ANI PHOTO.)

Week after Cyclone Amphan, Kolkata hit by squall at 96 kmph

Exactly a week ago, Cyclone Amphan, had battered the city with wind speed of 130 km per hour. The city is still limping back to normal with power supply yet to be restored in some pockets.
Hindustan Times, Kolkata | By HT Correspondent | Edited by Sohini Sarkar
UPDATED ON MAY 27, 2020 11:23 PM IST

Before Kolkata could come out of the shock of Cyclone Amphan, a squall hit the city on Wednesday evening with wind speed up to 96 km per hour.

Exactly a week ago, Cyclone Amphan, had battered the city with wind speed of 130 km per hour. The city is still limping back to normal with power supply yet to be restored in some pockets.

On Wednesday, a fire brigade official was electrocuted to death when he accidentally touched a live wire while carrying out restoration work in Howrah.

“We have lost a fire brigade officer. The power supply corporation had given misleading information saying that supply had been cut off. The officer, SS Roy, was electrocuted to death. It is a criminal offence. I have asked the police to investigate into it and take action against the person responsible,” Mamata Banerjee, West Bengal chief minister said.

The state government has already announced a compensation of Rs 10 lakh for his family and has also promised a government job for one family member.

The squall hit Kolkata around 6:20 pm triggering rain. The India Meteorological Department’s regional weather forecasting centre in Kolkata has predicted that there could be rain even on Friday. Strong winds have been blowing over the city and districts of south Bengal over the past few days.

“Some pockets where power connection could be restored for some days after the cyclone passed again plunged into darkness on Wednesday after the storm as power lines were snapped,” said an official of the state power department.

On May 20, Cyclone Amphan had hit the Bengal coast with wind speed going up to 185 km per hour. Large parts of south Bengal in eight districts plunged into darkness as more than 1.5 lakh km of power lines, including 30,000 km of high tension wire, were snapped.

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