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50 varsity teachers find a guru

MORE THAN 50 Sanskrit scholars, who teach the language at university level, will make Lucknow their ?gurukul? for two days to learn one of the most significant texts in Sanskrit?the ?Kavya Prakash? ?written by Acharya Mammat in the 12th Century.

india Updated: Feb 16, 2006 00:16 IST

MORE THAN 50 Sanskrit scholars, who teach the language at university level, will make Lucknow their ‘gurukul’ for two days to learn one of the most significant texts in Sanskrit—the ‘Kavya Prakash’ —written by Acharya Mammat in the 12th Century.

Uttar Pradesh Sanskrit Sansthan has organised this two-day learning session for the scholars. The auditorium of UP Sangeet Natak Akademi will be their classroom on March 3-4.

“Acharya Mammat’s ‘Kavya Prakash’ is a vital text for students who take up Sanskrit at a higher level. However, now the teachers face certain problem while teaching this text to students, as the teachers don’t have a deep knowledge about the text. In order to expand our base of knowledge about the text we requested Sanskrit Sansthan to organise this workshop,” says Navlata, reader at a college in Kanpur, one of the aspiring ‘shishya’ at the workshop.

“We have organised this workshop on the insistence of various readers, lecturers and professors of Sanskrit. They wanted someone to give them an in depth knowledge about this text,” says PK Pandey, director, UP Sanskrit Sansthan.

The workshop will be conducted by Prof Kailashpati Tripathi. He is a Sanskrit scholar from Benaras, who has various significant awards to his credit including the President’s Award and the Vishwa Bharti Award. Dr Manorama Gupta, Reader at a private college says, “We can easily call him one of the world’s Sanskrit intellects. Learning about this text from him will be an entirely new experience for us.”

Mammat’s ‘Kavya Prakash’ is a book of poetics. In its ten chapters it explains in detail the science of poetry along with the nature, forms and laws of Sanskrit poetry.

First Published: Feb 16, 2006 00:16 IST