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Badarpur

The Congress has not managed to win the Badarpur seat in the last two elections. In 1993, Ramvir Singh Bidhuri won on a Janata Dal ticket defeating Congress candidate Ram Singh Netaji by over 7,000 votes.

india Updated: Nov 28, 2003 14:47 IST

The Congress has not managed to win the Badarpur seat in the last two elections. In 1993, Ramvir Singh Bidhuri won on a Janata Dal ticket defeating Congress candidate Ram Singh Netaji by over 7,000 votes. He later joined the Congress and contested on the party’s ticket in 1998. He lost to Netaji, who had left the Congress and fought the polls as an Independent.

The two are once again pitted against each other though the symbols have changed once again. Netaji has gone back to the Congress and Bidhuri has left the party and will contest on a Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) ticket.

Netaji is confident of breaking the jinx — that the Congress candidate does not win from here — this year. “I will win as the people will vote for me for the work I have done in my constituency. My victory margin will be bigger than last time,” he said.

Bidhuri on the other hand, says that Netaji’s non-performance will prove to be his undoing. “He has not worked in the past five years. The people are angry with him and they know that I had done a lot when I was MLA. They will vote for me,” he said.

Though the BJP leaders haven’t got their hopes up for Badarpur, party candidate, Dr V.B. Singh, is putting up a brave front. According to his supporters, he is the only candidate from Purvanchal. A large section of the electorate comes from there. “There are a number of Gujjar candidates and only one from Purvanchal. This factor will ensure his victory,” said a supporter of Singh.

The constituency has over 2 lakh votes. Of them, about 40,000 are Gujjars residing mainly in four villages. Both Netaji and Bidhuri are Gujjars. The BSP candidate from here, Brahm Singh, is also a Gujjar.

A sizeable section of the voters, about 40,000, are Brahmins. The majority are, however, labourers who migrated from Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Haryana and Rajasthan. Badarpur has borders with Haryana and UP.

First Published: Nov 28, 2003 14:47 IST