Govt jittery over CB-CID probe | india | Hindustan Times
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Govt jittery over CB-CID probe

The CB-CID probe into the multi-crore food-for-work programme in Ballia has turned out to be a mill around the neck of the State government. There are desperate moves to protect some senior officers and politicians. Last week the government shunted out director general (CB-CID) JS Ghungesh to an insignificant Prosecution wing.

india Updated: Jun 06, 2006 01:21 IST

The CB-CID probe into the multi-crore food-for-work programme in Ballia has turned out to be a mill around the neck of the State government. There are desperate moves to protect some senior officers and politicians. Last week the government shunted out director general (CB-CID) JS Ghungesh to an insignificant Prosecution wing.

When the State government handed over the probe to CBCID it never expected the dimension of bungling in the programme under Sampoorna Gramin Rozgar Yojana (SGRY). However, now skeletons have tumbled out of the cupboard. The government, according to sources, was doing its best to bail them out of the messy situation.

The CBCID after preliminary investigation had registered FIR against 4700 persons including around 300 main accused consisting officers and politicians.

Thereafter, the agency sought permission from the government for further probe against them. The government granted the permission.

However when the agency was about to proceed against them there was great hue and cry in the State Assembly. Vidhan Parishad chairman Chaudhury Sukhram Singh Yadav expressing doubts in the House over the CB-CID probe, directed the government to hand over the inquiry to some other agency. Since the agency had already registered FIR at Ballia police station, the government could withdraw the probe only through court.

But it has power to transfer the case to Economic Offences Wing (EOW). However the possibility of “dilution” of the case during the CBCID investigation and final report in favour of “loved ones” could not be ruled out. The CB-CID, which was normally considered the “dumping ground” for criminal cases, has landed the government in a tricky situation.