Katrina leaves Bobby Jindal homeless | india | Hindustan Times
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Katrina leaves Bobby Jindal homeless

The Indian American Congressman was among thousands in New Orleans, who were left without food and shelter.

india Updated: Sep 01, 2005 11:53 IST

Indian American Congressman Bobby Jindal was among thousands of residents in New Orleans, Louisiana, who were left without food or electricity after Hurricane Katrina pounded the US Gulf coast.

"The events of the last 48 hours have hit us harshly, and the effects of Hurricane Katrina are still not fully known," Jindal, a resident of Louisiana's New Orleans that has been submerged under the flood waters, said on his website.

"I know most of you, like my family and I, have spent a restless night, evacuated from your homes and still without power. We are all worried about what we will find when we are finally given the all clear to return," he said.

Over 50 people were killed after the storm inflicted catastrophic damage all along the coast as it slammed into Louisiana with 224 kph winds, then swept across Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee.

The Louisiana Governor and the New Orleans mayor have called for all city residents to leave because of unforeseen floodwaters that are ravaging the downtown.

Jindal (Republican-Louisiana) is the first Indian American to be elected to Congress after California Republican Dalip Singh Saund who was elected in 1957.

Jindal's legislative victories on natural disaster compensation in Congress this year are critical for Louisianans as they fight yet another major calamity.

Soon after he came into Congress this year, he began to lobby and successfully got passed legislation reversing an earlier ruling that would have taxed compensation to his state's residents for monies they got as a result of natural disasters.

That law takes on added meaning for Louisianans now as they battle with massive devastation from Hurricane Katrina.

Scenes of people looting stores and homes to replenish their stores or to access essentials have become routine pushing Bush to declare on national television that severe action would be taken against looters.