Lawyers? chakka jam makes traffic go awry | india | Hindustan Times
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Lawyers? chakka jam makes traffic go awry

THE LAWYERS belonging to Central Administrative Tribunal (CAT) organised a chakka jam in front of the Allahabad High Court on Kanpur Road protesting the reported decision taken in the Union Cabinet meeting recently to delete the contempt power of Central Administrative Tribunal. Besides, in the meeting it was also proposed to include a provision under which the Central Government can abolish CAT or any of its branches, whenever it desires.

india Updated: Mar 23, 2006 00:07 IST

THE LAWYERS belonging to Central Administrative Tribunal (CAT) organised a chakka jam in front of the Allahabad High Court on Kanpur Road protesting the reported decision taken in the Union Cabinet meeting recently to delete the contempt power of Central Administrative Tribunal.

Besides, in the meeting it was also proposed to include a provision under which the Central Government can abolish CAT or any of its branches, whenever it desires.

The massive chakka jam began at 1 p.m. and continued for over one hour, throwing traffic out of gear.

The lawyers belonging to CAT also abstained from judicial work in protest against the reported move.

According to secretary of CAT Bar Association Ashish Srivastava, a meeting of lawyers of CAT was held under the presidentship of Ram Pal Singh, president of CAT Bar Association on Wednesday.

It was resolved in the meeting that a delegation of lawyers would meet the Union Minister of Law as well as Congress president Sonia Gandhi and place their demands before them.

They also resolved to continue their agitation till the proposed decision of Union Cabinet was rescinded.

Meanwhile, the Allahabad High Court Bar Association (HCBA) has decided to support the agitation of lawyers belonging to CAT.

A meeting held under the presidentship of secretary of HCBA Rakesh Pandey, which was conducted by joint secretary Shashi Shekhar Tiwari, opposed the proposed amendment in Administrative Tribunal Act 1985.

While condemning the decision, they termed it as anti-employee and anti-public.
It may be recalled that if aggrieved over any decision of the Central Government or its higher authorities, the Central Government employees can file their cases in CAT at the first instance.

If the employees or their departments are not satisfied with the Central Administrative Tribunal’s order, they may challenge it before the High Court by filing a writ petition. Thereafter, the last forum before them is the Supreme Court.