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Models look to stir passions at IFW

At the New Delhi International Fashion Week (NDIFW) last year, Binal Trevidi's lacy black number had revealed much more than a zeal to succeed.

india Updated: Jul 15, 2003 15:52 IST

At the New Delhi International Fashion Week (NDIFW) last year, Binal Trevidi's lacy black number had revealed much more than a burning zeal to succeed.

For those who saw through her shocking designs that time, the dare-bare model could have another eyeful in store. Among the fifteen new faces chosen for the India Fashion Week to be held in Mumbai later next month, Trevidi is working hard to give other rampwalkers a run for their money.

"A well-toned body that oozes oodles of oomph is a model's greatest asset. But unless you are bold enough to challenge socially acceptable dress codes, that potential could remain largely unexplored. Letting your body communicate freely with the audience is the secret to a winning catwalk and I am determined to prove it at the IFW this year," she says.

Known as one of the new kids on the ramp who shed clothes and inhibitions at the drop of a hat, Binal admits she won't mind revealing her assets before a fashion-literate crowd. And no one, least of all the Fashion Design Council of

India (FDCI) that picked her, is complaining. According to her: "It is my irresistible sex appeal and professionalism that helped me bag the current assignment. I worship work, so minor details like morality and ethics come only second to me."

The idea of starring in a thinly disguised peep show doesn't scare Trivedi. "Being India's premier fashion event, the IFW is not meant for the masses. I expect only the fashion connoisseur, critics and industry members to be present at the show. They are people with evolved sensibilities who can distinguish between sensuality and vulgarity. I am sure there'll be no quibbling over propriety," she quips.

Miss India 1st runners-up 2002 Gauhar Khan, another newcomer to the IFW, says it is not the model's place to debate right and wrong. "There's no model code of conduct to follow. It is the audience that makes a certain demand and the designer or choreographer who supplies it. Therefore I can only describe it as unfortunate if a model is hauled up each time people's sensibilities are offended. Everything we do on the ramp is what others want us to do," insists Khan.

First Published: Jul 15, 2003 15:52 IST