Officials blame lack of planning for water shortage in Delhi | india | Hindustan Times
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Officials blame lack of planning for water shortage in Delhi

Even as the city residents brave the scorching summer amidst scarcity of safe water, government officials have alleged that Delhi Jal Board authorities were not consulted before construction of some of the new residential colonies in the capital.

india Updated: May 21, 2003 10:51 IST
PTI

Even as the city residents brave the scorching summer amidst scarcity of safe water, government officials have alleged that Delhi Jal Board authorities were not consulted before construction of some of the new residential colonies in the capital.

"Delhi Jal Board was never consulted before building residential colonies such as Dwarka and Vasant Kunj which do not have any water bodies to provide water to the inhabitants," P C Chaturvedi, member Survey, Assessment and Monitoring in the ministry of Central Ground Water Board said at a public lecture on 'Contaminating Groundwater: Destroying our Last Reserves', on Monday.

In both the colonies, the inhabitants face acute shortage of water especially in summers, mainly depending on water, he said.

Delhi never had good quality of water reservoirs, he said adding with more and more people coming to the capital the problem had worsened.

Since, ground water and surface water are interconnected, pollution of one leads to that of the other, he said. "Over population is a major factor which aggravates the problem of potable water as human waste is the highest water pollutant after chemicals."

Stating that presence of heavy metals in water pose health problems, Professor P S Datta of Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) said, "as of now there is no method to treat water polluted by chemicals."

"Though metals like Cadmium and Zink don't create problem individually, their synergical effect is harmful for human health," Datta said. More

Waste from the industries also pollute water, paper industry being the biggest culprit followed by alcohol and sugar industries, he said.

Rapid growth in population, various developmental activities, unplanned disposal of waste water and forest loss are taking their toll on water quality, he said.

Even with the decreasing quality of gronud water people do not have any other alternative due to the high disparity in water supply through the pipelines, he said.

Intelligent use of water can solve the problem upto a great extent, he said adding in the West they use about five litre water to flush whereas in India about 15-20 litre is used for the same, Datta said.