?Parsis may become extinct by 2070? | india | Hindustan Times
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?Parsis may become extinct by 2070?

IN AN alarming disclosure, a research paper presented on ?changes and development of minorities in India? has said that the Parsi community would become zero population by the year 2070.

india Updated: Apr 17, 2006 14:39 IST

IN AN alarming disclosure, a research paper presented on ‘changes and development of minorities in India’ has said that the Parsi community would become zero population by the year 2070.

The research paper presented at a seminar at the Babasaheb Ambedkar National Institute of Social Sciences (BANISS) by faculty Dr D K Verma and research scholar Anju Sohrot has made significant inferences regarding the Parsi community.

Talking to Hindustan Times, Dr Verma said that the population of Parsis in India was 1,00,096 in 1901 comprising 51,123 males and 48,973 females and their growth rate at that time was 6.33. The growth rate was 5.08 in 1941 and as per the 1951 census there was a negative growth rate of –2.7 per cent.

The population showed a regular decline after independence and the growth rate was –21.52 per cent in 1981. This negative growth rate came under control and returned to –8.88 per cent in 2001. Dr Verma said that it is inferred on the basis of this trend that their population will become zero in 2070.

It is alarming that when the growth rate of Indian population is 21.34per cent, the Parsi population is showing a decline that could lead to extinction of one of the oldest and peace- and nature-loving community very soon if precautionary measures were not taken either by the government agencies, UNO or leaders of the community itself.

On the reasons of this decline, Dr Verma said that the most important reason of this was the rarity of the most important institution of sociology i.e. marriage. The members of this community avoid marriage; they prefer late marriage and like to live alone.

Second reason is the large proportion of population of old aged persons above 65 years of age. It was 17.9 per cent in 1961 and reached 30.9 per cent in 2001. The third reason is strong restrictions for exogamy, as they don’t allow their children to marry outside the religion. In case a Parsi girl marries a non-Parsi boy, the community does not accept both the girl and her husband.

Next reason is not new to Indian community and it is brain drain problem. The higher and professionally educated younger generation is moving out in search of better opportunities.