Saddam Hussein's trial resumes in Baghdad

For the second straight day, the session had a quiet start, a sharp contrast to the outbursts, insults and arguments that characterized past proceedings.

india Updated: Mar 01, 2006 17:46 IST

Saddam Hussein and his co-defendants quietly entered the courtroom on Wednesday for the latest session of their trial, a day after prosecutors presented their most direct evidence yet pinning the former Iraqi leader to executions of Shiites in the 1980s.

For the second straight day, the session had a quiet start, a sharp contrast to the outbursts, insults and arguments that characterised past proceedings.

The trial, which began October 19, appears to have entered a new phase, after chief judge Raouf Abdel-Rahman imposed control on the stormy tribunal and prosecutors began presenting the core of their case.

Prosecutors planned on Wednesday to bring several former regime officials to the witness stand.

Saddam's defence team attended the trial, as they did in Tuesday's session, after ending a boycott that had aimed to remove Abdel-Rahman, who they claimed was biased against the former Iraqi leader.

Abdel-Rahman rejected the demand in Tuesday's sessions, though the defense said it would appeal.

First Published: Mar 01, 2006 15:13 IST