The image shows the emu in question.(Facebook/@HaverhillPolice)
The image shows the emu in question.(Facebook/@HaverhillPolice)

Rescuers use pear to entice and capture escaped emu named Kermit

The emu named Kermit escaped from the property of a local resident who cares for unwanted animals.
Boston | By Associated Press | Posted By: Trisha Sengupta
UPDATED ON OCT 02, 2020 09:15 AM IST

An emu that was spotted roaming the streets of a city near Boston was corralled by authorities in Massachusetts.

The emu was reported on Wednesday morning in Haverhill, about 35 miles north of Boston, and was captured two hours later.

The Eagle-Tribune reported that the emu named Kermit, escaped from the property of a local resident who cares for unwanted animals. The resident had been preparing to transport Kermit to a farm in Maine when it fled.

Authorities say the bird was captured safely after it was given a pear from a nearby tree.

The police department also took to Facebook to share the incident along with an image of the bird.

“In her decade plus of service to the City of Haverhill, Animal Control Officer Cannon has responded to incidents involving a wide variety of animals, from common domestic animals to Moose and Bear. Earlier this morning on 17th Ave, she added an Emu to that list. With the assistance of patrol officers, the bird was safely corralled,” they wrote.

People shared all sorts of reactions on the post. “On an average day, you would say to yourself, “What on earth is an Emu doing walking down the street?” but given that it is 2020, you just keep driving,” joked a Facebook user. “Thank you for making me laugh! With all the craziness in this country, I was scrolling and saw this and laughed so hard. I guess the bird was just taking a stroll in the Avenues! Best picture of the week,” said another. “I can’t imagine turning the corner and seeing that. Lol,” commented a third.

Native to Australia, emus are the largest living bird after the ostrich and can reach up to nearly 100 pounds and a height of almost six feet. They run fast and can become aggressive.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Topics
Close
SHARE
Story Saved
OPEN APP