Farmers’ strike day 4: Wholesale vegetable prices remain steady, rains hike retail costs | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Farmers’ strike day 4: Wholesale vegetable prices remain steady, rains hike retail costs

Agricultural produce in Navi Mumbai wholesale markets was arriving in excess

mumbai Updated: Jun 04, 2018 23:55 IST
G. Mohiuddin Jeddy
G. Mohiuddin Jeddy
Hindustan Times
Farmers strike,Mumbai vegetable prices,APMC market
A vendor speaks on his mobile phone as he maintains his ledger book at a stall selling vegetables in Mumbai.(Reuters)

Four days into the farmers’ strike on Monday, wholesale vegetable prices remained unaffected in Navi Mumbai. Produce, in fact, was arriving in excess. Retail market prices, however, shot up owing to the arrival of pre-monsoon showers.

At the APMC market in Navi Mumbai, around 595 vehicles carrying vegetables arrived on Monday as against the average of 525 to 550.

Sandeep Sait, 55, a vegetable wholesaler said, “The arrivals are very good and the farmers’ strike has had absolutely no effect on the supplies. In fact, despite it raining all over the state and a lot of crop being damaged, we have had good supply to the market. The market is stable.”

Said said agricultural produce arrived from Pune, Sangli, Kolhapur, Satara and even Nasik — which was most affected because of the strike. “Some shortage from Nasik has been offset by supplies from outside the state including Delhi and Gujarat.”

“The arrivals are so good that the prices of some vegetables like capsicum and beans have come down from last week. If supplies continue to be this good, prices could further come down,” Sait said.

The retailers however claim that the showers have resulted in the vegetables rotting and hence they have to hike the price.

“The vegetable stock gets damaged in the rains and hence the price has gone up. We too can’t stock it for long. There is a lot of vegetable loss this season,” said Shaila Madhvi, 45, a vegetable retailer. “The customers want them cheaper and argue with us, but how can we sell at a loss when our cost itself is high.”