In pictures: Haiti’s deadly lock-up

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST 16 Photos
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Prisoners play dominoes, checkers or card games, during recreation time inside the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Inmates, some waiting up to eight years to see a judge, try to keep their sanity by maintaining a daily routine of push-ups and lifting jugs filled with dirty water. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Prisoners play dominoes, checkers or card games, during recreation time inside the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Inmates, some waiting up to eight years to see a judge, try to keep their sanity by maintaining a daily routine of push-ups and lifting jugs filled with dirty water. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner, too weak to stand, lies in the prison infirmary at the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitian prosecutors and rights activists are sounding an alarm about collapsing conditions at the impoverished country's prisons as malnutrition from acute food shortages and a slew of preventable illnesses are leading to an upsurge of inmate deaths. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner, too weak to stand, lies in the prison infirmary at the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haitian prosecutors and rights activists are sounding an alarm about collapsing conditions at the impoverished country's prisons as malnutrition from acute food shortages and a slew of preventable illnesses are leading to an upsurge of inmate deaths. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner puts food in a bag to send up to a fellow inmate. Prison authorities say they try their best to meet inmates' needs, but repeatedly receive insufficient funds from the state to buy food and cooking fuel. Some inmates are provided meals by visiting relatives and others are permitted by guards to meet with contacts to bring in food, cigarettes and other things. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner puts food in a bag to send up to a fellow inmate. Prison authorities say they try their best to meet inmates' needs, but repeatedly receive insufficient funds from the state to buy food and cooking fuel. Some inmates are provided meals by visiting relatives and others are permitted by guards to meet with contacts to bring in food, cigarettes and other things. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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Families with food in tow for their incarcerated relatives, line up in front of the National Penitentiary. Haiti’s penal system is by far the globe’s most congested, with a staggering 454 percent occupancy level, according to the most recent ranking by the University of London's Institute for Criminal Policy Research. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Families with food in tow for their incarcerated relatives, line up in front of the National Penitentiary. Haiti’s penal system is by far the globe’s most congested, with a staggering 454 percent occupancy level, according to the most recent ranking by the University of London's Institute for Criminal Policy Research. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner sells cigarettes to a fellow inmate. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner sells cigarettes to a fellow inmate. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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Prisoners in a courtyard at the National Penitentiary. Overcrowding, malnutrition and infectious diseases that flourish in jammed quarters have led to an upsurge of inmate deaths, including 21 at the Port-au-Prince penitentiary just last month. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Prisoners in a courtyard at the National Penitentiary. Overcrowding, malnutrition and infectious diseases that flourish in jammed quarters have led to an upsurge of inmate deaths, including 21 at the Port-au-Prince penitentiary just last month. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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Sick prisoners rest in the infirmary. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Sick prisoners rest in the infirmary. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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Tattoos on the chest and abdomen of a prisoner incarcerated at the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The tattoo on his chest reads in Haitian Creole: "After suffering is deliverance." (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Tattoos on the chest and abdomen of a prisoner incarcerated at the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The tattoo on his chest reads in Haitian Creole: "After suffering is deliverance." (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner combs the hair of a fellow inmate during recreation time. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner combs the hair of a fellow inmate during recreation time. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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Prisoners rest in makeshift hammocks inside the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Inmates in Haiti's largest prison are crammed shoulder-to-shoulder in cellblocks so overcrowded they have to sleep in makeshift hammocks suspended from the ceiling or squeeze four to a bunk. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Prisoners rest in makeshift hammocks inside the National Penitentiary in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Inmates in Haiti's largest prison are crammed shoulder-to-shoulder in cellblocks so overcrowded they have to sleep in makeshift hammocks suspended from the ceiling or squeeze four to a bunk. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner stands near the body of an inmate, covered with a plastic tarp, who died of malnutrition. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner stands near the body of an inmate, covered with a plastic tarp, who died of malnutrition. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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Prisoners cram up to watch TV in their crowded cell. Severe overcrowding is partly due to rampant corruption, as judges, prosecutors and lawyers join in creating a market for bribes, said Brian Concannon, director of the non-profit Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Prisoners cram up to watch TV in their crowded cell. Severe overcrowding is partly due to rampant corruption, as judges, prosecutors and lawyers join in creating a market for bribes, said Brian Concannon, director of the non-profit Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner pours hot oatmeal into a a large stock pot in the kitchen of the National Penitentiary. Some inmates are provided meals by visiting relatives but the majority of prisoners are dependent on authorities to feed them twice a day and get little more than rationed supplies of rice, oats or cornmeal. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner pours hot oatmeal into a a large stock pot in the kitchen of the National Penitentiary. Some inmates are provided meals by visiting relatives but the majority of prisoners are dependent on authorities to feed them twice a day and get little more than rationed supplies of rice, oats or cornmeal. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner bathes during recreation time. In 2008, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights ordered Haiti to bring its “inhuman” prisons in line with minimum international standards. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner bathes during recreation time. In 2008, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights ordered Haiti to bring its “inhuman” prisons in line with minimum international standards. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner fills his lunch bowl with rice and beans. Some foreign officials who have seen the system up close are exasperated by a lack of political will to solve problems of corruption, sluggish justice and prison conditions. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner fills his lunch bowl with rice and beans. Some foreign officials who have seen the system up close are exasperated by a lack of political will to solve problems of corruption, sluggish justice and prison conditions. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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A prisoner pulls a large stock pot filled with rice and beans during lunch. Prison authorities say they try their best to meet inmates' needs, but repeatedly receive insufficient funds from the state to buy food and cooking fuel, leading to deadly cases of malnutrition-related ailments such as beriberi and anemia. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

A prisoner pulls a large stock pot filled with rice and beans during lunch. Prison authorities say they try their best to meet inmates' needs, but repeatedly receive insufficient funds from the state to buy food and cooking fuel, leading to deadly cases of malnutrition-related ailments such as beriberi and anemia. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

UPDATED ON FEB 20, 2017 11:15 AM IST
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