Photos: Battle-scarred Marawi begins cleanup after 5-month long siege

War might still be raging in the ruins of the Philippine city of Marawi, but the cleanup has already begun. President Rodrigo Duterte‘s recent visit announcing its liberation from pro-ISIS forces has sparked hopes that hundreds of thousands of residents could soon begin returning home.

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST 9 Photos
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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (on stage in brown) raises a clenched fist declaring Marawi ‘liberated from terrorist influence’ on October 17, 2017. The military however has said the five-month battle against militants loyal to the Islamic State was not yet completely over despite cleanup efforts being initiated. (Ted Aljibe / AFP)

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (on stage in brown) raises a clenched fist declaring Marawi ‘liberated from terrorist influence’ on October 17, 2017. The military however has said the five-month battle against militants loyal to the Islamic State was not yet completely over despite cleanup efforts being initiated. (Ted Aljibe / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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Government troops wave as they travel back from their five-month stint against pro-ISIS militant groups on October 20, 2017. Army trucks crawled through the deserted streets to take displaced people to safe areas, while echoes of gunfire and explosions could still be heard from troops engaging the remaining Maute group militants hemmed into a shrinking battle zone. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

Government troops wave as they travel back from their five-month stint against pro-ISIS militant groups on October 20, 2017. Army trucks crawled through the deserted streets to take displaced people to safe areas, while echoes of gunfire and explosions could still be heard from troops engaging the remaining Maute group militants hemmed into a shrinking battle zone. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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A government worker is seen in front of an establishment marked with a ‘Maute ISIS’ graffiti --a term used for the militant alliance-- during the cleanup drive inside Marawi on October 20, 2017. The mosque-studded Islamic centre in the predominantly Roman Catholic country has been devastated by a siege by militants who waved IS-style black flags and occupied Marawi’s business district and outlying areas, according to the military. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

A government worker is seen in front of an establishment marked with a ‘Maute ISIS’ graffiti --a term used for the militant alliance-- during the cleanup drive inside Marawi on October 20, 2017. The mosque-studded Islamic centre in the predominantly Roman Catholic country has been devastated by a siege by militants who waved IS-style black flags and occupied Marawi’s business district and outlying areas, according to the military. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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Residents wave at government troops heading back after combatting pro-ISIS groups on October 20, 2017. The insurrection prompted the military to launch a ground offensive and airstrikes, with the US and Australia later deploying surveillance aircraft. Duterte also declared martial law across the south. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

Residents wave at government troops heading back after combatting pro-ISIS groups on October 20, 2017. The insurrection prompted the military to launch a ground offensive and airstrikes, with the US and Australia later deploying surveillance aircraft. Duterte also declared martial law across the south. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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Government soldiers from the Philippine Marines 1st Brigade patrol past damaged buildings during clearing operations in Marawi, on September 14, 2017. Marawi has been the homeland of minority Muslims and the scene of a decades-old separatist rebellion. The Philippine government’s response meant to deal with the uprising and prevent other insurgents from waging attacks elsewhere and reinforcing existing fighters in Marawi. (Marconi Navales / REUTERS)

Government soldiers from the Philippine Marines 1st Brigade patrol past damaged buildings during clearing operations in Marawi, on September 14, 2017. Marawi has been the homeland of minority Muslims and the scene of a decades-old separatist rebellion. The Philippine government’s response meant to deal with the uprising and prevent other insurgents from waging attacks elsewhere and reinforcing existing fighters in Marawi. (Marconi Navales / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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Philippine troops march during the battle for Marawi on August 30, 2017. Defense officials announced yesterday that two of the last leaders of the siege — Isnilon Hapilon, among FBI’s most-wanted terror suspects, and Omarkhayam Maute — were killed in a gunbattle. Military spokesman Maj. Gen. Padilla said Malaysian Mahmud bin Ahmad, who bankrolled the siege is also believed killed. (Froilan Gallardo / REUTERS)

Philippine troops march during the battle for Marawi on August 30, 2017. Defense officials announced yesterday that two of the last leaders of the siege — Isnilon Hapilon, among FBI’s most-wanted terror suspects, and Omarkhayam Maute — were killed in a gunbattle. Military spokesman Maj. Gen. Padilla said Malaysian Mahmud bin Ahmad, who bankrolled the siege is also believed killed. (Froilan Gallardo / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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Philippine soldiers walk past destroyed buildings in Bangolo district on October 17, 2017. Defence officials say it could take until January before rebuilding can start, with the heart of the city littered with unexploded bombs, booby traps and buildings on the brink of collapse after months of air strikes. Military operations have cost $97 million and the government estimates it could take 10 times that much to rebuild Marawi. (Ted Aljibe / AFP)

Philippine soldiers walk past destroyed buildings in Bangolo district on October 17, 2017. Defence officials say it could take until January before rebuilding can start, with the heart of the city littered with unexploded bombs, booby traps and buildings on the brink of collapse after months of air strikes. Military operations have cost $97 million and the government estimates it could take 10 times that much to rebuild Marawi. (Ted Aljibe / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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Evacuees seen at rehabilitation centre, as government troops continue their operations in Marawi, on September 7, 2017. Under the guard of dozens of police and soldiers, about 100 of the 200,000 residents driven from their homes during 5 months of fighting returned to start what will likely be a prolonged rehabilitation programme. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

Evacuees seen at rehabilitation centre, as government troops continue their operations in Marawi, on September 7, 2017. Under the guard of dozens of police and soldiers, about 100 of the 200,000 residents driven from their homes during 5 months of fighting returned to start what will likely be a prolonged rehabilitation programme. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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Though sporadic fighting ensues, the speed of citizens’ return will depend on how quickly the city is declared safe and rebuilt. Australia, the US, Singapore, Russia, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank have offered help. But already close to the front lines of the effort is China, which has donated 47 heavy-duty industrial vehicles, among them excavators, bulldozers, tractors, cement mixers and dump trucks. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

Though sporadic fighting ensues, the speed of citizens’ return will depend on how quickly the city is declared safe and rebuilt. Australia, the US, Singapore, Russia, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank have offered help. But already close to the front lines of the effort is China, which has donated 47 heavy-duty industrial vehicles, among them excavators, bulldozers, tractors, cement mixers and dump trucks. (Romeo Ranoco / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 20, 2017 02:44 PM IST
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