Photos: Istanbul vets ensure the well-being of stray animals

Istanbul officials are increasing efforts to ensure good health of the animals on the streets. As part of their efforts, a ‘Vetbus,’ that serves as a mobile clinic for stray animals, is stationed for several days in different neighbourhoods around the city. Moreover, veterinarians employed by the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality vaccinate, sterilise and tend to the animals. Consequently, the number of animals treated by the vets has increased exponentially over the years, and no case of rabies has been detected in Istanbul since 2016.

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST 8 Photos
1 / 8
A veterinarian of Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality checks stray dogs as workers feed them at Sariyer, northern Istanbul. Officials in the city are increasing efforts to ensure the good health of the street animals, and thereby of the residents who come into contact with them. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

A veterinarian of Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality checks stray dogs as workers feed them at Sariyer, northern Istanbul. Officials in the city are increasing efforts to ensure the good health of the street animals, and thereby of the residents who come into contact with them. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
2 / 8
A worker of Istanbul metropolitan municipality feeds stray dogs at Sariyer, northern Istanbul. “People generally bring the animals that they take care of... so that they are given anti-parasite” treatment, said Nihan Dincer, a veterinarian working for the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IBB). And “because people are in constant contact with them, they are also protected”, she added. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

A worker of Istanbul metropolitan municipality feeds stray dogs at Sariyer, northern Istanbul. “People generally bring the animals that they take care of... so that they are given anti-parasite” treatment, said Nihan Dincer, a veterinarian working for the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IBB). And “because people are in constant contact with them, they are also protected”, she added. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
3 / 8
The Vetbus is pictured at Rumelihisari district in northern Istanbul. The bus is a mobile clinic stationed for several days in different neighbourhoods around the Turkish metropolis. Here, stray animals are rescued, examined and put up for adoption. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

The Vetbus is pictured at Rumelihisari district in northern Istanbul. The bus is a mobile clinic stationed for several days in different neighbourhoods around the Turkish metropolis. Here, stray animals are rescued, examined and put up for adoption. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
4 / 8
A stray dog is pictured at Sultangazi Health Centre at Sultangazi in western Istanbul. An animal protection law passed in 2004 forced municipalities to take care of street animals. In Istanbul, as well as the mobile clinic, IBB maintains six health centres. The aim is to vaccinate, sterilise and take care of around 1,30,000 dogs and 1,65,000 cats who live on the streets, according to the municipality. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

A stray dog is pictured at Sultangazi Health Centre at Sultangazi in western Istanbul. An animal protection law passed in 2004 forced municipalities to take care of street animals. In Istanbul, as well as the mobile clinic, IBB maintains six health centres. The aim is to vaccinate, sterilise and take care of around 1,30,000 dogs and 1,65,000 cats who live on the streets, according to the municipality. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
5 / 8
A veterinarian checks a puppy at Sultangazi Health Centre. The stray animals, fitted with a microchip, are then taken back to where they were found, except those which are adopted by individuals during their stay at the health centres. Due to the development of these services, the municipality has cared for 73,608 animals in 2018 -- that compares with only 2,470 back in 2004. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

A veterinarian checks a puppy at Sultangazi Health Centre. The stray animals, fitted with a microchip, are then taken back to where they were found, except those which are adopted by individuals during their stay at the health centres. Due to the development of these services, the municipality has cared for 73,608 animals in 2018 -- that compares with only 2,470 back in 2004. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
6 / 8
Nihan Dincer, veterinarian of the Vetbus, checks a stray cat on January 31, 2019 at Rumelihisari district in northern Istanbul. There hasn’t been a single case of rabies in Istanbul since 2016, according to the municipality which employs 100 veterinarians and veterinary technicians. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

Nihan Dincer, veterinarian of the Vetbus, checks a stray cat on January 31, 2019 at Rumelihisari district in northern Istanbul. There hasn’t been a single case of rabies in Istanbul since 2016, according to the municipality which employs 100 veterinarians and veterinary technicians. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
7 / 8
People look at a puppy presented in a showcase on a Vetbus for adoption at Rumelihisari district in northern Istanbul. While animals living on Istanbul’s streets are often well fed, in the forests surrounding the city, “animals don’t have a place to feed themselves,” Umut Demir, a veterinarian at IBB, said. So around a tonne of food is distributed each day by vans dispatched full of dry food which is consumed by the dogs. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

People look at a puppy presented in a showcase on a Vetbus for adoption at Rumelihisari district in northern Istanbul. While animals living on Istanbul’s streets are often well fed, in the forests surrounding the city, “animals don’t have a place to feed themselves,” Umut Demir, a veterinarian at IBB, said. So around a tonne of food is distributed each day by vans dispatched full of dry food which is consumed by the dogs. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
8 / 8
Tugce Demirlek, chief veterinarian of the Sultangazi Health Centre poses with a stray dog. According to Demirlek, the fact that the animals are well fed and cared for ensures that they are calm and limits any aggressive behaviour. But the number of dogs has remained fairly stable in the past few years despite sterilisation efforts. “We sterilise them systematically, but the animals that we do not catch continue to reproduce,” she explained. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

Tugce Demirlek, chief veterinarian of the Sultangazi Health Centre poses with a stray dog. According to Demirlek, the fact that the animals are well fed and cared for ensures that they are calm and limits any aggressive behaviour. But the number of dogs has remained fairly stable in the past few years despite sterilisation efforts. “We sterilise them systematically, but the animals that we do not catch continue to reproduce,” she explained. (Ozan Kose / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 12:54 PM IST
SHARE
Story Saved