Photos: Puerto Rican village cut off by Hurricane Maria in dire straits

Nearly a month after Hurricane Maria battered Puerto Rico, residents in the village of San Lorenzo face the grim realities of isolation, a lack of power and running water, following the destruction of the sole two-lane bridge connecting the remote village to the outside world.

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST 9 Photos
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In the Puerto Rican village of San Lorenzo, Hurricane Maria destroyed the two-lane concrete bridge connecting residents with the outside world –making landfall on September 20, 2017. San Lorenzo remains without power or running water ever since. Like many remote villages, San Lorenzo now contends with a silent public health crisis in the wake of the strongest hurricane to hit the island in decades: isolation. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

In the Puerto Rican village of San Lorenzo, Hurricane Maria destroyed the two-lane concrete bridge connecting residents with the outside world –making landfall on September 20, 2017. San Lorenzo remains without power or running water ever since. Like many remote villages, San Lorenzo now contends with a silent public health crisis in the wake of the strongest hurricane to hit the island in decades: isolation. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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Carmen Rodrigues stands by her bedridden mother, Rosa Maria Torres, 95. ‘If they don’t move her out of here, she’s going to die,’ Carmen Santos, Torres’ granddaughter, said. Before the storm, a hospital was only a 15-minute drive away in the town of Morovis. Now, the only way out is wading across a river knee-deep as floodwaters have receded, or detouring by car on the mountain road. Santos does not think her grandmother would survive either option. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

Carmen Rodrigues stands by her bedridden mother, Rosa Maria Torres, 95. ‘If they don’t move her out of here, she’s going to die,’ Carmen Santos, Torres’ granddaughter, said. Before the storm, a hospital was only a 15-minute drive away in the town of Morovis. Now, the only way out is wading across a river knee-deep as floodwaters have receded, or detouring by car on the mountain road. Santos does not think her grandmother would survive either option. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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Haydee Mestre, a resident, looks inside her refrigerator after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town’s bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

Haydee Mestre, a resident, looks inside her refrigerator after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town’s bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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A boy looks out at his neighbourhood in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico. No one can say when - or if - the bridge will be rebuilt, but it is unlikely to be a high priority on an island with so many needs after the hurricane. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

A boy looks out at his neighbourhood in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico. No one can say when - or if - the bridge will be rebuilt, but it is unlikely to be a high priority on an island with so many needs after the hurricane. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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A general view of San Lorenzo after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

A general view of San Lorenzo after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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Local residents cross a river using a cable in lieu of the town’s destroyed bridge in San Lorenzo. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

Local residents cross a river using a cable in lieu of the town’s destroyed bridge in San Lorenzo. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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Ruth Santiago, a resident, refreshes herself with water from a pipe, lacking running water in San Lorenzo. Another resident said US officials came and took measurements after the bridge fell but nobody has returned and there is no word about plans for reconstruction. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

Ruth Santiago, a resident, refreshes herself with water from a pipe, lacking running water in San Lorenzo. Another resident said US officials came and took measurements after the bridge fell but nobody has returned and there is no word about plans for reconstruction. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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A local resident carries a gasoline can as he crosses a river using a cable in San Lorenzo. One other villager, dependent on dialysis treatment, was placed in a water barrel and pushed across the river by his neighbours. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

A local resident carries a gasoline can as he crosses a river using a cable in San Lorenzo. One other villager, dependent on dialysis treatment, was placed in a water barrel and pushed across the river by his neighbours. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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Residents walk along a devastated landscape after Hurricane Maria ravaged San Lorenzo. With schools closed until at least January and their main link to the world broken, many village residents are considering fleeing to the mainland United States. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

Residents walk along a devastated landscape after Hurricane Maria ravaged San Lorenzo. With schools closed until at least January and their main link to the world broken, many village residents are considering fleeing to the mainland United States. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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