Photos: Recovery and rescue in full swing after Typhoon Hagibis hits Japan

Military and fire department helicopters rescued survivors from roofs and balconies in several locations in Japan after the country was hit by Typhoon Hagibis, the strongest typhoon to affect the country since 1958. More than 20 people have been killed by the powerful typhoon, with about 100 injured. The figures are set to rises, as authorities find it difficult to deduce the damage. The storm brought travel chaos during a long holiday weekend, grounding flights and halting local and bullet train services.

Updated On Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST
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A resident is rescued by a Japan Self-Defence Force helicopter as the house is submerged in muddy waters after an embankment of the Chikuma River broke because of Typhoon Hagibis, in Nagano, central Japan. Rescue efforts for people stranded in flooded areas are in full force after a powerful typhoon dashed heavy rainfall and winds through a widespread area of Japan, including Tokyo. (Yohei Kanasashi / AP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

A resident is rescued by a Japan Self-Defence Force helicopter as the house is submerged in muddy waters after an embankment of the Chikuma River broke because of Typhoon Hagibis, in Nagano, central Japan. Rescue efforts for people stranded in flooded areas are in full force after a powerful typhoon dashed heavy rainfall and winds through a widespread area of Japan, including Tokyo. (Yohei Kanasashi / AP)

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Rows of Japan’s bullet trains, parked in a facility, sit in a pool of water in Nagano, central Japan. More than 20 people were killed by the powerful typhoon, local media reported Sunday, a day after the ferocious storm slammed into the country. The storm moved off land today morning, and while it largely spared the capital, it left a trail of destruction in surrounding regions. (Yohei Kanasashi / AP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

Rows of Japan’s bullet trains, parked in a facility, sit in a pool of water in Nagano, central Japan. More than 20 people were killed by the powerful typhoon, local media reported Sunday, a day after the ferocious storm slammed into the country. The storm moved off land today morning, and while it largely spared the capital, it left a trail of destruction in surrounding regions. (Yohei Kanasashi / AP)

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Residents on a rubber boat are rescued as they were stranded in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture. More than 100,000 rescuers, including 31,000 troops, were working into the night to reach people trapped after torrential rain caused landslides and filled rivers until they burst their banks. In Fukushima, Tokyo Electric Power Co reported irregular readings from sensors monitoring water in its Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plant was crippled by a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. (AP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

Residents on a rubber boat are rescued as they were stranded in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture. More than 100,000 rescuers, including 31,000 troops, were working into the night to reach people trapped after torrential rain caused landslides and filled rivers until they burst their banks. In Fukushima, Tokyo Electric Power Co reported irregular readings from sensors monitoring water in its Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The plant was crippled by a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. (AP)

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Surging waves hit against the breakwater and a lighthouse as Typhoon Hagibis approaches at a port in town of Kiho, Mie prefecture, central Japan on Saturday. Hagibis, which means “speed” in the Philippine language Tagalog, made landfall on Japan’s main island of Honshu on Saturday evening and headed out to sea early on Sunday, leaving behind cloudless skies and high temperatures across the country. (Toru Hanai / AP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

Surging waves hit against the breakwater and a lighthouse as Typhoon Hagibis approaches at a port in town of Kiho, Mie prefecture, central Japan on Saturday. Hagibis, which means “speed” in the Philippine language Tagalog, made landfall on Japan’s main island of Honshu on Saturday evening and headed out to sea early on Sunday, leaving behind cloudless skies and high temperatures across the country. (Toru Hanai / AP)

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Residential areas are submerged in muddy waters after an embankment of the Chikuma River, top right, broke because of the typhoon in Nagano, central Japan. The storm, which the government said could be the strongest to hit Tokyo since 1958, brought record-breaking rainfall in many areas, including the popular resort town of Hakone, which was hit with 939.5 mm (37 inches) of rain over 24 hours. (Yohei Kanasashi / AP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

Residential areas are submerged in muddy waters after an embankment of the Chikuma River, top right, broke because of the typhoon in Nagano, central Japan. The storm, which the government said could be the strongest to hit Tokyo since 1958, brought record-breaking rainfall in many areas, including the popular resort town of Hakone, which was hit with 939.5 mm (37 inches) of rain over 24 hours. (Yohei Kanasashi / AP)

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Damaged houses caused by weather patterns from Typhoon Hagibis are seen in Ichihara, Chiba prefecture. The typhoon claimed its first victim yesterday even before making landfall, as potentially record-breaking rains and high winds sparked evacuation orders for more than a million people. Landslides and flooding claimed more lives overnight, and the toll climbed higher after sunrise on Sunday, as the scale of the devastation wrought by Hagibis became clear. (AFP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

Damaged houses caused by weather patterns from Typhoon Hagibis are seen in Ichihara, Chiba prefecture. The typhoon claimed its first victim yesterday even before making landfall, as potentially record-breaking rains and high winds sparked evacuation orders for more than a million people. Landslides and flooding claimed more lives overnight, and the toll climbed higher after sunrise on Sunday, as the scale of the devastation wrought by Hagibis became clear. (AFP)

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A man stuck in his apartment unit looks on from his residential block as floodwaters recede in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis in Kawasaki. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe convened an emergency meeting to take stock of the situation. “With respect to blackouts, water outage and suspension of transportation services, we intend to exert all-out efforts for the earliest recovery ... we ask the public to remain vigilant of landslides and other hazards,” he said. (Odd Anderson / AFP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

A man stuck in his apartment unit looks on from his residential block as floodwaters recede in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis in Kawasaki. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe convened an emergency meeting to take stock of the situation. “With respect to blackouts, water outage and suspension of transportation services, we intend to exert all-out efforts for the earliest recovery ... we ask the public to remain vigilant of landslides and other hazards,” he said. (Odd Anderson / AFP)

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Residential areas are seen along with swollen Tama river after Typhoon Hagibis hit the area in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. In Saitama’s Higashi Matsuyama city, northwest of Tokyo, rice and flower farmers were counting their losses, with water submerging warehouses full of freshly harvested produce. “We never had a flood like this before in this neighbourhood,” said one farmer. “I don’t know where to start cleaning this mess,” he said. (Takuya Inaba / AP)
Updated on Oct 13, 2019 05:34 PM IST

Residential areas are seen along with swollen Tama river after Typhoon Hagibis hit the area in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. In Saitama’s Higashi Matsuyama city, northwest of Tokyo, rice and flower farmers were counting their losses, with water submerging warehouses full of freshly harvested produce. “We never had a flood like this before in this neighbourhood,” said one farmer. “I don’t know where to start cleaning this mess,” he said. (Takuya Inaba / AP)

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