Bakri Eid in Pune: Family, prayers, mutton chops... and sheer kurma | pune news | Hindustan Times
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Bakri Eid in Pune: Family, prayers, mutton chops... and sheer kurma

On the occasion of Bakri Eid, meat is divided into three parts: family retains one-third of the share; another third is given to relatives, friends and neighbours; and the remaining third is given to the poor and needy

pune Updated: Sep 01, 2017 13:19 IST
Anjali Shetty
Sakina, Aliasgar, Farzana and Mohammed Mukthiar start their meal with a pinch of salt on the occasion of Bakri Eid.
Sakina, Aliasgar, Farzana and Mohammed Mukthiar start their meal with a pinch of salt on the occasion of Bakri Eid.(HT Photo)

Bakri Eid, also known as Eid-Ul-Adha, is a traditional festival celebrated across the globe. The Muslim community in Pune too welcomes the festival with pomp and grandeur. Saeed Sheikh, a city-based entrepreneur shares, “For centuries, the tradition follows the sacrifice of an animal, usually a goat by an affluent Muslim family. It dates back to the time when Ibrahim (Abraham) was willing to sacrifice his son Ismaeel, as an act of obedience to God's command. Before he sacrificed his son, God intervened by putting a ram in his son's place. To mark Ibrahim’s ultimate sacrifice, the festival is celebrated.”

Many families like the Sheikhs celebrate this festival. Aliasgar Mukhtiar , founder of Food-Adda adds, “Bakri Eid is one of the most important festivals for our community. We start the meal with a pinch of salt, usually from the Namak dani (salt holder in Bohri). We prepare a biryani, mutton chops, shahi tukda and sheer kurma.”

Actor Faisal Khan shares, “Bakri Eid is a very special festival for us, as it happens only once a year. We read our namaz first thing in the morning, which is the most important part of this festival. Post that, we have a lot of relatives coming home to meet and greet. This is one time where we actually meet up with the entire family, which is very special for me. So this year too, my entire family is going to meet up for the festival and celebrate together.”

Shagufta Sheikh, an engineer and mother of Arafath Sheikh, states that the meat is divided into three parts: the family retains one-third of the share; another third is given to relatives, friends and neighbours; and the remaining third is given to the poor and needy. “The idea is to share the sacrifice among everyone. We wear new clothes, offer prayers and teach the younger generation the significance of the festival.”