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Campus connect: Puneites speak about clubbing their way to a successful career

College clubs allow students not only to gain practical skills but also to develop corporate contacts

pune Updated: Mar 22, 2018 23:18 IST
Ananya Barua
Ananya Barua
Hindustan Times, Pune
Students members of CSAT club working in their lab in College of Engineering, Pune.
Students members of CSAT club working in their lab in College of Engineering, Pune. (Sanket Wankhade/HT Photo )

Many city students feel that academics alone is not enough, and the secret of landing into a dream career is through specialisation and practical exposure, made possible through participation in college clubs.

To understand this route, Hindustan Times met few members of prominent colleges, who revealed how their extra curricular activities have opened positive paths for them.

Symbiosis Institute of Business Management (SIBM) alumni 24-year old Arth Dodeja, who is now a manager atMahindra & Mahindra, said,“In college, I was a part of the alumni cell and the corporate interface team, which allowed me to build several corporate contacts and as well as gain practical skills, which are of vital importance in the industry. From negotiating with vendors, working in a team, organising events, budgeting to planning and execution, all these skills are not taught within classrooms even in a B-school, and that is where these clubs are crucial. Further, this builds up your resume.”

However, landing into a dream job or getting priority during placements are not the only benefits of being part of a club. “Education should be beyond textbook knowledge . We wanted to take our academic experience to a new level through the English Literature Association. For this, we hold poetry slams, debate competitions, film screenings etc every month,” said Aparna Bose, 3rd year B.A English student of Fergusson College.

“Big dreams need bigger efforts, which are not always conventional, and that is what led us to form the Delta club, which concentrates on creating sustainable innovation for the larger good,” said 22-year old Akshay Deshmukh, a 3rd year electronics and telecommunication engineering student. He along with his classmate, Bhavesh Rathod, had formed this club at College of Engineering, Pune, which houses 30 other clubs, including the famed CSAT club which had created the first student-made Indian satellite SWAYAM in 2015. However, unlike others, this club wants to give back to the society.

“There are over 200 projects submitted in the college every year, but not many are transformed into products. We wanted to change that scenario and create a solar-charged electric bike, which can match the efficiency of a high-end commercial bikes and yet not be harmful to the environment. We want to launch an on-campus startup which will not just benefit students, but will also be commercially viable for the institute. We are moving towards that,” Deshmukh added.

Many city students feel that academics alone is not enough, and the secret to landing into a dream career is through specialisations and practical exposure, made possible through college clubs. To understand this route, Hindustan Times met a number of club members of prominent colleges, who revealed how their extra curricular activities have carved positive paths for them.

As a means to gain practical knowledge and earn brownie points during placements, Symbiosis Institute of Business Management (SIBM) alumnus 24-year old Arth Dodeja, who is now a manager atMahindra & Mahindra, said,“In college, I was a part of the alumni cell and the corporate interface team, which allowed me to build several corporate contacts and as well as gain practical skills, which are of vital importance in the industry. From negotiating with vendors, working in a team, organising events, budgeting to planning and execution, all these skills are not taught within classrooms even in a B-school, and that is where these clubs are crucial. Further, this builds up your resume that simple academics will not be able to provide, thus giving you an edge over other candidates.”

Parikshit Biswas, BSc Physics student of Fergusson College and a member of the 21-year old Astro Club, said,“I got to know about IUCAA after joining the club and my interest in astrophysics was nurtured by this platform, so much so that I Ianded as an intern there. With this as a base, I got the chance inIndian Academy of Sciences through which I worked on a project in IISER, Bhopal. The club harnessed my interest in cosmology research, a path I wish to pursue in future.”

However, landing into a dream job or getting priority during placements are not the only benefits of being part of a club.

“Big dreams need bigger efforts, which are not always conventional, and that is what led us to form the Delta club, which concentrates on creating sustainable innovation for the larger good,” said 22-year old Akshay Deshmukh, a 3rd year electronics and telecommunication engineering student. He along with his classmate, Bhavesh Rathod, had formed this club at College of Engineering, Pune, which houses 30 other clubs, including the famed CSAT club which had created the first student-made Indian satellite SWAYAM in 2015. However, unlike others, this club wants to give back to the society.

“There are over 200 projects submitted in the college every year, but not many are transformed into products. We wanted to change that scenario and create a solar-charged electric bike, which can match the efficiency of a high-end commercial bikes and yet not be harmful to the environment. We eventually want to gather funds and launch an on-campus startup which will not just benefit students with respect to gaining practical knowledge and experience, but will also be commercially viable for the institute. But, that is a big dream towards which we are taking baby steps,” Deshmukh added.